War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0458 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, D. C., June 30, 1863.

J. R. FRY, Esq./,

Chairman, Philadelphia:

General Couch explains that his order is pursuant to the act of Congress which directs enlistments in the U. S. service to be for a period of not less than six months unless sooner discharged, and that the Governor's enlistments are for three months. The general's view of the law is correct, and there should be no difficulty in conforming to it. If the present raid is overcome, it will be in less than there months, and there will be no disposition to hold troops longer than necessary. it they will enlist only for three months, let it be done under the State organization.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D, C., June 30, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Philadelphia, Pa.:

The muster-in rolls of the 60,000 State militia should have words "Pennsylvania" Instead of "United States," and "Governor" in lieu of "President." They are not called out by the United States, nor are they to be mustered into U. S. service.

In reply to your telegram of yesterday.

THOMAS M. VINCENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, June 30, 1863.

Major-General BROOKS,

Pittsburgh:

To your telegram of this date, * I reply-

First. That the transportation accounts in respect to the three- months" men called out by Governor Curtin must be settled by the Quartermaster's Department.

Second. The quartermaster will fill requisition for clothing for three-months" men add by Governor Curtin, who must make the requisition.

Third. I understand that the troops called out by Governor Curtin decline to be sworn into the U. S. service, but will be turned over to your command by the Governor. The offer should be made to receive them in to the U. S. service, so that they may accept or refuse. But if they refuse, you will, nevertheless, receive them and furnished quarters and subsistence while they serve under your command, without insisting upon their being sworn into the U. S. service.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of war.

[JUNE 30, 1863.-For correspondence relating to Pennsylvania militia, see Brooks to Stanton; McClure to Lincoln, Series I, Vol. XXVII, Part III, pp. 435, 436.]

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* See Series I, Vol XXVII, Part III, p. 435.

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