War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0385 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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[Indorsement.]

OFFICE ACTG. ASST. PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

Montpelier, Vt., June 18, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded, and recommend that a military force may be sent to Rutland.

T. G. PITCHER,

Brigadier-General and Actg. Asst. Provost-Marshal-General.

[JUNE 19, 1863.- For correspondence relating to raising troops in Delaware, see Schenck to Cannon, Series I, Vol. XXVII, Part III, p. 221.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington City, D. C., June 19, 1863.

Major General A. E. BURNSIDE,

Cincinnati:

GENERAL: I have recently conversed with several prominent citizens of Ohio and Indiana, including Governor Morton, and they are unanimously of the opinion that the policy of appointing district commanders in those States is injurious. They say that it conveys to the people an idea that they are being subjected to military constraint; that difficulties are multiplied between the civil and military authorities, the former taking offense at the assumption of the latter; that the public feeling is becoming strong that these military commanders, with their numerous staffs, had much better be in the field fighting the enemy than in exercising unnecessary military authority in the loyal States.

I know that representations to the same effect have for some time been made to the War Department, and I think it would be well for you to consider this matter and the propriety of withdrawing these district commanders and leaving the control, as much as possible, in the hands of the Governors and civil authorities. For example, why not leave Governor Morton, with the commanding officer at Indianapolis, to manage affairs in that State and put General Willcox and his staff in the field? I know that Willcox is an excellent officer, but he is a stranger in Indiana and is not likely to understand their political squabbles. The Governor has made no complaints of him or of any one else, but he does not see any necessity for his being there at all. Moreover, there are daily applications for more generals in the field, with recommendations innumerable to make new ones, for which there are no vacancies. Now, if generals can be spared for the unimportant duties of commanding districts in the loyal States, where there are only a handful of troops, they should be sent to other armies in y wanted.

I write this simply as a suggestion for your consideration.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, June 19, 1863.

MY DEAR SCHOFIELD: The only force I will have in many places to enforce the enrollment and draft will be the Invalid Corps.

25 R R-SERIES III, VOL III