War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0310 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

demonstrate their value as a means of observation, although there might be occasions when even more service could be rendered:

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

April 28, 1863.

Professor LOWE,

Chief of Balloon Department:

PROFESSOR: The general commanding desires you to have your balloon up to-night, to see where the enemy's camp-fires are. Some one acquainted with the position and location of the location of the ground and the enemy's forces should go up.

Very respectfully,

PAUL A. OLIVER,

Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp.

BALLOON IN THE AIR,

April 29, 1863 - 10 a. m.

Major-General SEDGWICK,

Commanding Left Wing, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: The enemy's line of battle is formed in the edge of the woods at the foot of the heights from opposite Fredericksburg to some distance to the left of our lower crossing. Their line appears quite thin compared with our force. Their tents all remain as heretofore, as far as can be seen.

T. S. C. LOWE,

Aeronaut.

12 M.

The enemy's infantry are moving to our right about four miles below our crossing on a road just beyond the heights. The enemy do not appear to advance.

T. S. C. LOWE.

1.30 P. M.

The enemy are moving wagon trains to their rear. Their force, which is in position opposite our crossing, is very light. I should judge not more than we now have across the river.

T. S. C. LOWE.

2.45 P. M.

About two regiments of the enemy's infantry have just moved forward from the heights and entered the rifle-pits opposite our lower crossing. Heavy smokes are visible about six miles up the river on the opposite side in the woods.

T. S. C. LOWE,

Chief of Aeronautics.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

April 29, 1863.

Professor LOWE, &c.:

The major-general commanding directs that one of your balloons proceeds to-night or before daybreak to-morrow to Banks" Ford, or vicinity, and takes position to ascertain with regard to the force of the enemy between Fredericksburg, Bowling Green, and Banks" Ford. A signal telegraph is working between here and Banks" Ford, by which information can be communicated.

It is especially desired to know the comparative strength of the enemy's force at Franklin's Crossing, and in the vicinity of Banks" Ford, and above to the west of Fredericksburg.

BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

April 29, 1863.

Major General J. SEDGWICK,

Commanding Sixth Corps:

GENERAL: The commanding general desires that you will please have the accompanying communication sent at once to Professor Lowe, who is supposed to be in your vicinity.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.