War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0273 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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The general will probably establish his headquarters on the steamer Commodore in a day or two.

I inclose your accounts approved, and with an order for its payment by Lieutenant-Colonel Macomb indorsed thereon.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

March 23, 1862.

T. S. C. LOWE,

Chief Aeronaut, National Hotel, Washington:

The commanding general directs that you proceed with your balloons and apparatus to Fort Monroe, Va., and there await his further orders.

It is understood that you have left a balloon with General Wardsworth, and that General F. J. Porter has one with him. Is this so? Please answer.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

March 23, 1862.

Prof. T. S. C. LOWE,

Chief Aeronaut, National Hotel:

The commanding general directs that on arriving at Fort Monroe you land all your balloons save one, which you will keep on board subject to his future directions.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

On the 3rd of April I received an order from General McClellan to accompany General Porter in his advance to Yorktown. On the following morning at 5 o"clock the division left Hampton and advanced as far as Cockletown, and on the 5th arrived in front of Yorktown. The aeronautic train, consisting of four army wagons and two gas generators, having to move in the rear, arrived a little after noon and were put in position for inflating the balloon. Our operations were impeded for an hour or more by our position being shelled by the enemy, but notwithstanding this the balloon was ready at 5.30 o"clock, and an observation was taken by an officer of the general's staff. At 3 o"clock the next morning I ascended and remained up until after daylight, observing the camp-fires and nothing the movements of the enemy. On descending a messenger handed me the following order:

APRIL 6, 1862.

Professor LOWE:

The commanding general desires you to make an ascension as soon as you can. Look for the movement of wagons and teams; also where the largest number of men are.

Send word what is passing as soon as you can.

Very respectfully,

FRED. T. LOCKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

These observation being of great importance, I went to General Porter's tent and made my report, and requested that he should ascend that he might judge for himself of the number of the enemy and strength of their works. This he did, and remained up one hour and forty-five minutes at an elevation of 1,000 feet, and within a mile of the enemy's works. On descending, all the generals were called together and a council held. During the day several draughtsmen were sent up who sketched maps of the positions of the enemy, &c. In the afternoon the Count de Paris ascended with General Porter, and near sundown General Butterfield ascended to a height of 1,000 feet.

18 R R-SERIES III, VOL III