War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0120 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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the fire that they had to be railed. The heavy business about to be thrown upon this line rendered a large increase of sidings necessary, both at Aquia and at points along the line. The total length of main track and sidings laid is about three miles.

It was soon ascertained that a single wharf on the site of the old one, even with the large addition projected and since built, would not be sufficient to meet the demands of the service; therefore it was determined to build a branch railroad to Yuba Dam one mile and a half in length, where a wharf has been built of sufficient capacity to hold twenty-four cars. Vessels drawing ten feet and a half of water can come up to it at low tide. By this arrangement the capacity of the railroad has been increased nearly one-half, and for a sudden movement of troops it will prove invaluable.

By direction of Brigadier-General Haupt the buildings upon the wharf and most of the buildings on shore were erected by the railroad force, a large amount of suitable material having been prepared before-hand; and while in doing this much has been added to our expenditures, the expenses of the pot quartermaster have been correspondingly reduced.

From November 25, 1862, to March 12, 1863, there have been transported over this road, exclusive of construction materials and special trains:

Cars loaded with--

Quartermaster's stores.................................. 915

Commissary stores ........................................ 2,363

Forage.................................................... 4,663

Railroad supplies ........................................ 112

Ordnance, ammunition, &c ................................. 132

Mails and passengers ..................................... 644

Total ..................................................... 8,812

Estimating ten tons per car, we have 88,120 tons carried, or an average of 800 tons per day. Our daily business one averages 140 cars.

The Seaboard and Roanoke and Norfolk Petersburg Railroads.-

These lines were taken possession of August 10, 1862. A connection wa made between them at Suffolk, to which point they are now operated.

There have been transported over the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad from above date until March 1, 1863, 59,000 passengers and 56,800 tons of freight between Norfolk and Suffolk, a distance of twenty-three miles.

The Seaboard and Roanoke Railroad is used daily, but to a small extent.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. McCALLUM

Colonel and Mil. Dir. and Supt. Railroads of United States.

GENERAL ORDER,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 92.

Washington, April 8, 1863.

Authority is hereby given to retain in service officers and men now on signal duty whose term of service will expire before they can be examined by a board to be appointed for that purpose under the act approved March 3, 1863, provided their conduct and qualifications are such as to make it advantageous to the service to retain them.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.