War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0038 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

be regulated on some plan that will secure proper responsibility and economy as well as prompt payment upon proper vouchers.

But the most important point necessary to the success of the system is the establishment and thorough organization of the bureau at Washington. The order was not intended as anything more than the basis of the system. Its details must be arranged and adapted to the nature of the service by a mind exclusively devoted to the subject, and which is to be its director and manager. The numerous contingencies that must arise from to time, and which cannot be foreseen, must be met as they arise, and provided for in a manner that shall harmonize with the general system. Full and complete instructions should be framed for the government of subordinate officers in the discharge of all their duties, so as to produce uniformity of administration and prevent injustice and oppression, as well as produce energy and efficiency in the Department. Proper blanks are to be provided, a system of reports established; information obtained should be filed, tabulated, and arranged for constant use and reference. The inspiration of vigor in the entire system must come from its head, who should be in constant and direct communication with the War Department, and be of sufficient rank and position to sustain and be held to the responsibility incident to sofice.

with these conditions fulfilled, I do not doubt that all the good results expected from the plan contemplated in General Orders, Numbers 140, will be fully realized.

Very respectfully, yourt,

C. P. BUCKINGHAM,

Brigadier-General and Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 38.

Washington, February 10, 1863.

General Orders, Numbers 154, and paragraph I, of General Orders, Numbers 162, of 1862, authorizing the enlistment of volunteers in the Regular Army, are hereby rescinded.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., February 10, 1863.

Captain SILVEY,

Providence, R. I.:

SIR: The Governor of Rhode Island is hereby authorized to raise a colored regiment of infantry or heavy artillery, so called, to be organized according to the rules and regulations of the service and officered by white officers.

The U. S. mustering officer will muster them by companies or as presented, for a service of three years or during thaw war. The proper departments will furnish all supplies of clothing arms, subsistence, and equipments upon proper requisitions. The colonel, lieutenant-colonel, adjutant, quartermaster, surgeon, and captain, and all commissioned officers shall be mustered into the U. S. service according to the regulations.