War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0021 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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transportation, organization, supplies, subsistence, arms, and equipments of such volunteers.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, January 27, 1863.

Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State:

SIR: In reply to your communication of this date relative to the communication of the Chevalier Bertinatti in regard to cannon for certain Italian war steamers now in progress of construction, I have the honor to reply that as it is found impossible to have cannon cast as rapidly as the requirements of our own service demand, it is regarded by this Department as a military necessity that no foreign Governments should be allowed to obtain cannon from any of our foundries during the present war.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

IN THE STATE OF THE UNITED STATES,

January 31, 1863.

Resolved, That the President be requested, if not incompatible with the public interest, to communicated to the Senate any orders issued by the Secretaries of War and of the Treasury in regard to a general prohibition to export arms and munitions of war from the United States, and especially to the Mexican Republic, and any orders in regard to the exportation of articles contraband of war for the use of the French army invading Mexico.

Attest:

J. W. FORNEY,

Secretary.

WASHINGTON, D. C., January 31, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: The attention of Congress was called some months ago, through the Secretary of War, by committees of officers of Engineers and Topographical Engineers to the importance of uniting the two corps, and a bill was presented for that purpose, but failed to pass both Houses. Since then a new organization has been given to our armies, which seems to require some changes in the bill then presented. The inclosed draft of bill seems well calculated to accomplish the desired object. At present there are in our service, two distinct branches of engineers originally having distinct functions, but many of their duties being now common to both, I think the interests of the service will be promoted by uniting the Engineers andngineers into a single corps of about the same numerical strength.

From a faulty organization of their corps, these engineers, though graduating higher in their classes, have generally been junior in rank to those below them at the Military Academy, and hence as large a number as were permitted have, in the present war, eagerly embraced the opportunity of obtaining higher promotion in the volunteers, thus depriving their corps of their professional services, so essential