War of the Rebellion: Serial 124 Page 0018 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 29.

Washington, January 19, 1863.

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22. Brigadier General E. R. S. Canby, U. S. Volunteers, will report in person without delay to the Adjutant-General of the Army for assignment to special duty in his office, to date from 15th instant.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

January 19, 1863.

His Excellency President JEFFERSON DAVIS:

Mr. PRESIDENT: Upon receiving your letter of the 7th instant, on the subject of General Milroy's orders, I immediately wrote to General Halleck, inclosing copies of these orders. He has replied to my letter under the date of January 14. I inclose his letter, with a copy of my own, for your consideration.*

Hoping that the correspondence may serve to put some check upon Milroy in his treatment of the inhabitants of the Valley,+

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

[JANUARY 19, 1863.-For Howe to Stanton, reply of latter, and Stanton to Elliott, in relation to habeas corpus cases in Wisconsin, see Series II, Vol. p. 190.]

CONSULATE-GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Frankfort-on-the-Main, January 20, 1863.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I have shipped to-day, for the use of the wounded soldiers, to America, via Hamburg, three casks of linen and lint, and forwarded the same free of charge to Hamburg, and the enterprising and liberal American firm of James R. McDonald & Co., of Hamburg, have kindly offered to pay the transportation of all this linen from there to New York. It is all consigned to care of Mayor Opdyke, John A. C. Gray, esq., and Frederic Kapp, esq. It has been contributed here and in the neighboring towns by Germans and Americans who have friends and relatives in the Union Army, and among the contributors are officers and members of the courts to whom I am accredited. I shall forward altogether not less, perhaps, than from 6,000 to 10,000 pounds. I thought it best to advise you of the same, as you may know where some of it can best be used. Much of it has been picked into lint at the numerous little lint parties held a the houses of the few Americans living here, though some of it was prepared before being sent to me.

The late victories in the West have cheered up our desponding hearts, and we hope soon to see a restoration of that glorious old Union. I have communicated the fact to Mayor Opdyke that I could probably send him in a few weeks from here, if desired, for our Army from 20,000 to 30,000 experienced veteran soldiers who have seen

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* See pp. 10, 15.

+ For reply, see Series I, Vol. XXI, p. 1108.

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