War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0859 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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unteer troops raised within the limits of your State upon what has been termed "independent acceptances." He also requests that you will report the number of regiments or independent companies now organizing in your State, the present strength-thereof, and the time at which they will probably be completed and ready to take the field.

I am, Governor, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, January 9, 1862.

Brigadier General LORENZO THOMAS,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: His Excellency Governor Andrew has to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 3rd instant, in which you request to be informed:

1. The number of regiments of two-years' volunteers, also of three-years' volunteers, and also the number of independent companies of volunteers furnished by Massachusetts to the date of your communication.

2. The strength of each regiment or company.

3. The arm of the service to which each belonged when transferred to the General Government.

4. Similar details as to all two or three years' volunteer troops raised within the limits of Massachusetts upon what has been termed "independent acceptances."

5. The number of regiments or independent companies now organizing in Massachusetts, the present strength thereof, and the time at which they will probably be completed and ready to take the field.

The answers to these inquiries will be found in the statement hereto annexed.

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. G. BROWNE, Jr.,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Military Secretary.

Statement annexed to reply of January 9 to the letter of Adjutant-General Thomas of January 3, 1862.

Question 1. The number of regiments of two-years' volunteers?

Answer. None.

Question. The number of regiments of three-years' volunteers?

Answer. Twenty-five (twenty-four of infantry and one of cavalry).

Question. The number of independent companies of volunteers?

Answer. Five (of infantry), battalion at Fort Warren. Six (of infantry), serving in New York regiments, four of them in what is called the Mozart Regiment and two in what is called the Excelsior Brigade. One (of infantry), forming part of the garrison at Fortress Monroe. Five (of light artillery), battery companies. Two (of sharpshooters). Making a total of twenty-four regiments and twelve companies of infantry, one regiment of cavalry, two companies of sharpshooters, and five batteries of light artillery.

Questions 2 and 3. The strength of each regiment or company when transferred to the General Government, and the arm of the service to which each then belonged?