War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0814 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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independent permissions at all, even under this pressure, but that certainly it had not been intended to do any person or any State a wrong. In closing the conversation on this subject, the President added that he was very familiar with it in all its bearings at this moment, because it had been laid before him personally during the few preceding days by His Excellency Governor Morgan, of New York, who, he remarked, appeared to have been embarrassed in the same manner as yourself, but to a greater extent; that in the instance of New York an arrangement had therefore been made intended to obviate all these difficulties, and it was to be presumed that it might be necessary to apply the same remedy to the other States.

In this connection we inclose a copy of the General Order of the U. S. War Department, Numbers 71, which bears date yesterday, showing the manner in which the subject has been arranged in New York, and we understand the President and Secretary of War to have assured us that the same principles of adjustment are applicable to Massachusetts, and that, if necessary, a similar general order will be directed to be issued with regard to our own State.

We have the honor to remain, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN H. REED,

Quartermaster-General.

A. G. BROWNE, JR.,

Military Secretary.

GENERAL ORDERS, WAR DEPT., AJDT., GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 71.

Washington, September 5, 1861.

I. All persons having received authority to raise volunteer regiments, batteries, or companies in the State of New york will immediately report to His Excellency Governor Morgan, at Albany, the present state of their respective organizations. They and their commands are placed under the orders of Governor Morgan, who will reorganize them and prepare them for service in the manner he may judge most advantageous for the interests of the General Government.

By order:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 5, 1861.

Honorable JOHN A. ANDREW,

Governor of Massachusetts:

DEAR SIR: In reply to your favor relative to organization of troops, I will say that the best method, in my opinion, is for you to proceed with organization of regiments as authorized, the expense of which will be paid from time to time by requisitions from you, accompanies with proper certificates and original bills.

We desire your active co-operation in the organization of an army sufficiently powerful to crush the Southern rebellion and forever set at rest the question of secession. Allow me to tender the thanks of this Department for services you have rendered the country by promptly supplying all demands made for forces.

Very respectfully, your friend,

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.