War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0794 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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and the difficulty of obtaining correct returns and reports has been so great that perfect accuracy in the schedules referred to cannot be expected. If errors have occurred, they are omissions and not exaggerations of our forces.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHESTER HARDING, JR.,

Adjutant-General of Missouri.

[Inclosure.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Saint Louis, January 1, 1862.

His Excellency Governor H. R. GAMBLE:

SIR: The records of this office exhibit nothing in regard to the organization of the militia as it existed prior to June 12, 1861, the date of Governor Jackson's proclamation announcing that he had espoused the cause of the rebels and calling upon the people of the State to support him. In fact, no troops were raised on behalf of the Government under our militia law of 1859 until a few days before the whole system was changed by the convention in October last, and consequently our militia rolls give but a faint indication of the efforts which our loyal citizens have made to maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and laws of the land. it is therefore thought proper that, although no official account of our earlier action was ever furnished to the State authorities, such information as can be furnished respecting the military strength put forth by the State at the outset of our difficulties should be embodied in this report.

The President's proclamation calling for 75,000 three-months' volunteers, under which Missouri was to furnish four regiments, was issued on the 15th of April, 1861. On the 22nd of the same month the arsenal gates were thrown open for the reception of these troops. On that day some 2,000 men were mustered, and in the course of a fortnight four regiments of infantry and an artillery battalion, numbering in all upward of 4,500 men, had been raised, and the Fifth Regiment of Infantry was about half formed.

Early in May authority was obtained to enroll and arm the loyal citizens of Saint Louis as a Reserve Corps, the number so enrolled not to be more than sufficient to make the whole number of volunteers and Reserve Corps amount to 10,000. This limit was not strictly adhered to. On the 7th, 8th, and 11th days of May five regiments of Reserve Corps, numbering 4,774 officers and men, were mustered.

A brigade morning report of 1st of June shows the strength of the whole force then under the command of General Lyon to have been as follows:

First Regiment Volunteers, Colonel F. P. Blair............... 1,220

Second Regiment Volunteers, Colonel H. Boerstein............. 1,128

Third Regiment Volunteers, Colonel F. Sigel.................. 1,103

Fourth Regiment Volunteers, Colonel N. Schittner............. 1,027

Fifth Regiment Volunteers, Colonel C. E. Salomon............. 926

Battalion of artillery, Major Backof...................... 253

Pioneer company, Captain Voerster......................... 120

First Regiment, U. S. Reserve Corps, Colonel H. Almstedt..... 1,195

Second Regiment, U. S. Reserve Corps, Colonel H. Kallman..... 763

Third Regiment, U. S. Reserve Corps, Colonel John McNeil..... 839

Fourth Regiment, U. S. Reserve Corps, Colonel B. Gratz Brown. 1,169

Fifth Regiment, U. S. Reserve Corps, Colonel Stifel....... 1,014

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Total..................................................... 10,730

The whole of this force was raised in Saint Louis, and it is due to our German fellow-citizens to say that they furnished at least four-