War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0757 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, December 23, 1861.

Governor CURTIN, Harrisburg:

The arms for Colonel James' regiment have been sent by General McClellan to Williamsport. Please send the men there to receive them without delay.

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT,

Washington, December 23, 1861.

His Excellency Governor A. G. CURTIN,

Harrisburg, Pa.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 18th instant asking for copies of reports of the present state of the defenses of the river Delaware the harbor of Erie. In reply I have to state:

Fort Delaware, forty-five miles below Philadelphia, is now ready to receive its entire armament, amounting to 135 large guns, besides 20 flanking 24-pounder howitzers. For Miffin, seven miles below the city, as also ready for its entire armament, consisting of 47 large guns. Besides these preparations, application is now before Congress for a grant of money to commence a new fort opposite to Fort Delaware and for the means of increasing the defensive capacity of Fort Mifflin, as well as completing the barrack accommodations of Fort Delaware.

With respect to Erie, on the lake, Congress is also asked to grant a large sum of money for the purpose of providing temporary defenses at such points on the northern frontier as may require them.

Copies of the estimates for these purposes are inclosed herewith for your information.*

I have the honor to be, &c.,

JOS. G. TOTTEN,

Brevet Brigadier-General and Colonel of Engineers.

[DECEMBER 24, 1861.-For act of Congress making appropriation for gun-boats on the Western rivers, see Statutes at Large, Vol. 12, p. 331.]

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, December 24, 1861.

Brigadier General JOSEPH G. TOTTEN,

Chief of Engineer Department:

SIR: I have to request that early attention may be given to the condition of the fortifications on the river Delaware, in order to secure the protection of the city of Philadelphia. The history of the Revolution, as well as that of the war of 1812, sufficiently manifests the importance of its security in a military point of view, and the promptitude with which her citizens, equally with those of the State of which she is the metropolis, have rallied to the support of our institutions, as heretofore to their establishment and defense, claims for her at this time the common interest of the country.

Respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.

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*Estimate omitted.

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