War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0733 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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[Inclosure Numbers 2.] Estimate of amount required for temporary and field fortifications and engineer operations in the field for bridge trains and equipage, and for tool and siege trains, for the second half of the fiscal year ending on the 30th of June, 1862, and for the fiscal year ending on the 30th of June, 1863.

Designation of Amounts Amounts Total amount

the object necessary for included in required for

estimated for. expenditure the regular the unexpired

during the estimates for portion of the

unexpired fortifications current fiscal

portion of the for fiscal year and for

fiscal year year ending the fiscal

ending on the 30th of June, ending on 30th

30th of June, 1863, as of June, 1863.

1862, in submitted to

addition to Congress at

appropriations the present

already made session.

for that year.

For temporary .............. $500,000 $500,000

and field

fortifications

and engineer

operations in

the field.

For bridge $250,000 250,000 500,000

trains and

equipage.

For toll and .............. 250,000 250,000

siege trains.

Total. 250,000 1,000,000 1,250,000

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT,

Washington, December 9, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

Respectfully submitted.

JOS. G. TOTTEN,

Brevet Brigadier-General and Colonel of Engineers.

ORDNANCE OFFICE,

Washington, December 9, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: As directed from the War Department, I have examined the reports upon the Henry and Spencer guns accompanying the proposition to furnish these arms to the Government, had have also examined the arms. Both of them are magazine arms; that is to say, they have the cartridges for use carried in a magazine attached to or forming part of the arm and fed out by a spiral spring. They require a special kind of ammunition, which must be primed or have the fulminate in itself. The reports heretofore made are favorable, so far as the limited trails went, but they do not go farther than to suggest or recommend the procurement of a sufficient number to place in the hands of troops in the filed for train. Indeed, it is impossible, except when arms are defective in principle, to decide with confidence, in advance of such practical trails, on their value, or otherwise, as military weapons. I regard the weight of the arms with the loaded magazine as objectionable, and also the requirement of a special ammunition, rendering it impossible tousle the arms with ordinary cartridges or with powder and ball. It remains to be shown by practical trail what will be the effect on the cartridges in the magazine of carrying them on horseback, when