War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0600 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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PROVIDENCE, October 26, 1861.

S. CAMERON:

We have furnished of three-months' volunteers one regiment of infantry (1,096 men) and one battery of artillery, 145 men. Three-years' volunteers, two regiments of infantry, 866 men each; one regiment of infantry, 900 men; 5 batteries of artillery, 150 men each. We shall furnish in addition to the above by December 1, for the war, one regiment of infantry, 866 men; three batteries of artillery, 150 men each; one regiment of cavalry.

ED. C. MAURAN,

Adjutant-General.

For WILLIAM SPRAGUE.

WHEELING, VA., October 26, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON:

Governor Peirpoint absent. Virginia furnished one three-months' regiment of volunteers, composed of 760 men. Will have by December 1 ten regiments infantry, which will aggregate 9,000 men; tow regiments cavalry, of 2,400; one artillery battalion of 600. Total by December 1, 12,000 men.

H. J. SAMUELS,

Adjutant-General.

MADISON, WIS., October [26], 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON:

Wisconsin sent one regiment for three months; officers and men, 810. The other regiments were for the war, up to the Thirteenth, including the First, reorganized; will average 1,000 men each; one company of sharpshooters for Berdan's regiment, 103 men, and seven companies artillery by the 1st of December. If we get any money from Government can furnish in all seventeen regiments infantry, a full regiment artillery, and a full regiment of cavalry.

ALEX. W. RANDALL.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

Santa Fe, October 26, 1861.

Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have delayed any communication with the Department of State until now in the expectation that I might have something of interest to communicate, but since my inauguration there has nothing transpired of a nature to render a communication of any value to the Government. The invading forces of Texans remain still in the neighborhood of Fort Fillmore, and are threatening an advance on Fort Craig, some ninety miles north of that place. This, however, I think they will not do, as there is now a respectable force at that post, and additional forces accumulating daily, preparatory to a march upon them. I have no fears as to the result.

In consequence of the surrender of Fort Fillmore, the probable advance of the Texans into the interior, together with the unsettled state of our Indians on the west and southwest, I have deemed it prudent to organize the militia of this Territory, which has never been