War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0586 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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any importance in comparison with the disastrous effect that the measure will have upon our own people, and no advantage we could gain in a foreign country could compensate for the great loss and injury at home.

It is the entire oneness of feeling and of interest between the Government and the people of the loyal States and entire confidence each in the other that has induced the vast army now in the field to spring as one man to the defense of the nation. But more volunteers are wanted. Is it wise, therefore, to risk by any experiment the danger of causing distrust to arise in the minds of the people, or to give them reason to feel that while they may be risking their live-field, those they have at home are likely to suffer the direful effects of want of employment, and that while we are draining the country of its resources we are not only making the final result far worse, but we are taking the present bread from the mouths of our own people to feed those of a foreign nation?

Asking the attention of the Honorable Secretary at the earliest moment to this important subject,

We have the honor to remain, most respectfully, your obedient servants,

CHAS. G. NAZRO,

ALEX. H. RICE,

GARDNER BREWER,

E. S. TOBEY,

T. W. LINCOLN, Jr.,

Special Committee of the Boston Board of Trade.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, October 22, 1861.

General TAYLOR,

Commissary-General:

SIR: From information received by this Department from reliable sources there is great reason to believe that the Government is paying very exorbitant rates for the subsistence of troops in the various camps throughout the West. In some instances it is said that from 45 to 50 cents man per day have been agreed to be paid, whilst it is alleged that the real cost of subsistence should not have been more than from 14 to 20 cents per man per day. The matter is considered of sufficient importance to justify this Department in calling your special attention to it, in order that such steps may immediately be taken as shall be necessary to remedy the evil, if it exists as it has been alleged.

Very respectfully,

THOMAS A. SCOTT,

Assistant Secretary of War.

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., October 22, 1861.

Colonel THOMAS A. SCOTT,

Assistant Secretary of War:

There are at the depot in this city about forty boxes of guns for Fremont, who does not need them. I can put two more regiments in the field that are now waiting if I am allowed to take these guns. Shall I do so? Kentucky needs the men.

O. P. MORTON,

Governor of Indiana.