War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0582 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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[OCTOBER 21, 1861.-For General Orders, No. 2, Department of New England, relating to the organization of troops, &c., see p.834.]

[OCTOBER 21, 1861.-For Thomas to Cameron, relating to affairs in Fremont's command, &c., see Series I, Vol. III, p.540.]

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, October 21, 1861.

Governor RANDALL,

Madison, Wis.:

Send Colonel Anneke's regiment to Louisville with instructions to report to General Sherman for orders. If ready to move send them to-day.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.

MADISON, WIS., October 21, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

Have the 5,000 muskets and accouterments ordered through the Ordnance Office on the 8th of October for our Wisconsin troops been shipped? Please answer immediately. We have two regiments ready who want arms.

A. W. RANDALL,

Governor.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington City, October 22, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War, War Department:

SIR: The within communication from the Board of Trade of Boston has been handed to this office with a request to transmit it to the Secretary of War.

The matter has been discussed with the Secretary, and I am of opinion that the order to inspect and purchase an extra quantity of cloth was a wise one and ought not to be revoked. While the public, not truly advised as to the orders of the Government and excited by reports such as have been published in certain newspapers that the Government had sent out a credit of pound 5,000,000 or $25,000,000, and in other papers that $60,000,000 had been sent out, may misjudge it, the fact is that it is proposed only to spend $800,000, in these purchases, and to purchase and ship only for instant and pressing wants of the service.

Governors daily complain that recruiting will stop unless clothing is sent in abundance and immediately to the various recruiting camps of regiments.

With every exertion, this department has not been able to obtain clothing to supply these demands, and they have been so urgent that troops before the enemy have been compelled to do picket duty in the late cold nights without overcoats, or even coats, wearing only the thin summer flannel blouses.