War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0570 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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been able to fill, with the request that those of most pressing importance should be designated, so that the delay, unavoidable in some cases, should, as far as possible, fall upon those which could best be deferred.

The requisition for the State of New York was one thus reported as most pressing.

I trust, therefore, in a short time the Treasury will be able to make some remittances to Captain Hodges. It as a remarkable thing that the people should volunteer in this was so rapidly that the resources of the country cannot provide the material for clothing them as fast as they come forward, but so it is. We are largely in debt to contractors at all the principal points of purchase and I fear we will so remain for some time to come, though if we once get the troops equipped the great stimulus to manufacturing, and the importations which we may reasonably expect from Europe before long, will, I trust, enable us to keep them from suffering.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

HARRISBURG, October 10, 1861.

Honorable S. CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

All my efforts to send you troops thwarted for want of a mustering officer.

A. G. CURTIN,

Governor.

HARRISBURG, October 10, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

It is proper for you to know, in referring parties to me with your approbation who wish to raise regiments, that eighty regiments are now gone or going forward, an excess over all your requisitions.

A. G. CURTIN,

Governor.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, October 10, 1861.

Governor CURTIN,

Harrisburg:

Complete the number of organizations now ready. The letter will all be subject to your discretion.

SIMON CAMERON.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE,

No. 89. Washington, October 11, 1861.

Supplies forwarded by particular States for their volunteers in the service of the United States will be turned over to the proper staff departments of the Army, and issued, according to law and regulations, to the troops of the States for which they were specially intended. But as such supplies will eventually be charged to the United States,