War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0567 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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JACKSON, MICH., October 7, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

I have two regiments which might march in about five days. Neither of them are armed, there being no arms in the State. One of them is fully equipped, except the arms; the other will be in the time stated unless the uniforms are delayed on the way.

AUSTIN BLAIR,

Governor of Michigan.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, October 7, 1861.

His Excellency EDWIN D. MORGAN,

Governor, &c., Albany, N. Y.:

SIR: Your favor of the 1st instant has been received. Its hopeful tone with regard to the raising of an additional quota of troops affords the Department much satisfaction. The contents of your communication have been duly noted and will receive full consideration at the proper time.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

October 8, 1861.

GEORGE L. SCHUYLER, Esq.,

Paris, France:

SIR: Your letter, with enclosures, of the 19th ultimo, advising of the shipment of revolvers and cartridges by the steamer Fulton, has been received. I notice with much regret that there are no guns sent, as it was the confident expectation that 20,000 would be received by the Fulton, and accordingly arrangements were made to distribute them through the different States. Prompt and early shipments of guns are desirable. We hope to hear by next steamer that you have shipped from 80,000 to 100,000 stand.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS A. SCOTT,

Assistant Secretary of War.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Albany, N. Y., October 8, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: Within the next ten days I can send to the seat of war from this State full 3,000 cavalry soldiers, mostly, perhaps entirely, uniformed, and I will be pleased to be advised by the Department whether these soldiers shall be sent to Washington as fast as they can be organized and uniformed, arms and equipments to be furnished at Washington. General Meigs advises that horses also will be sugton. There are at least 3,000 cavalry soldiers being raised in this State in addition to the above, with a fair prospect of several thousand more soon, unless enlistments in this arm of the service shall be discouraged.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

E. D. MORGAN.