War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0491 UNION AUTHORITIES.

Search Civil War Official Records

NEW YORK, September 7, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

Authorize positively to organize an Irish brigade of 5,000 men. I can do so forthwith and have it ready in thirty days to march . Please reply at once authoritatively by telegraph afterward by official letter. Expedition in the matter of vital importance.

Yours, sincerely,

THOMAS FRANCIS MEAGHER,

Captain, Sixty-ninth Regiment.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

September 7, 1861.

THOMAS FRANCIS MEAGHER,

New York:

Make application at once to Governor Morgan. He will give authority for organization.

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.

COLUMBUS, OHIO, September 7, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

Within one week four infantry regiments, three cavalry companies ready for the field-the infantry, however, being concentrated at Camp Dennison for defense of Cincinnati and to operate in Kentucky. In addition, twenty regiments organized, averaging about one-third full, which will be delayed some weeks for want of clothing, blankets, equipments, &c. To encourage recruiting add a few to commence recruiting in a few days. Cavalry and artillery delayed from same cause-General Ripley's incapability to fulfil his promise to furnish cavalry equipage and artillery harness. It has thrown us much aback since Manassas affair. We have sent into the field infantry regiments, three batteries, four guns each, and two cavalry companies. The encourage recruiting, please authorize me to purchase 10,000 to 15,000 full suits of clothing, to distribute among recruits immediately on enlisting. Give us prompt clothing and arms, and it will add this fall many thousands to the present complement. Would be glad if possible, to give you 100,000 men. You will need to have all.

W. DENNISON.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 7, 1861.

His Excellency ANDREW G. CURTIN,

Governor of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, Pa.:

SIR: Your letter of the 21st ultimo, which, instead of having been directed to this Department, was addressed to the President of the United States, was brought to my attention this morning for the first time by your messenger. The President informs me that he never received the letter, and upon inquiry I find that when it reached this Department it was placed upon file without having been laid before me for consideration. I regret the consequent delay, and upon becoming acquainted with your request this morning I at once directed that