War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0445 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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more advantage than in commanding divisions, brigades, and regiments of new troops, particularly when it is remembered that we have almost none of the old troops at our disposal.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,

Major-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

Madison, August 22, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

The bearer, Honorable Thomas Hood, is the agent of this State, and carries to you a requisition for artillery equipments and arms for the five new regiments and five batteries ordered by you from this State. This order should be filled at once, as it will greatly facilitate the organization of the regiments and artillery companies. He is authorized to take such steps as are necessary to hasten their transportation hither. Some suitable person ought to be authorized as assistant quartermaster, or in some other capacity, to look after the transportation of troops, arms, & c., and to make purchases of such things, horses, & c., as are necessary to facilitate the authorities of the State in the present exigencies of the country.

Very respectfully,

ALEX. W. RANDALL.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, August 23, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith, for your information, a dispatch, Numbers 14, with the inclosure accompanying it, received from the U. S. consul at London. I will thank you to return the papers after having made such use of them as you think proper.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

[Inclosure.] Numbers 14.] CONSULATE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, London, July 19, 1861.

Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State:

SIR: Your dispatch of June 10, covering a dispatch dated May 5, from Mr. Hollis White, notifying me of the suspected visit of Captain J. D. Bulloch to England, was duly received. This man is here and his movements are observed. He is in frequent counsel with Messrs. Yancey, Huse, Holland, and other Southern agents here. He and Huse went to the Continent yesterday - I understand to Paris.

Thus far I have not been able to learn whether or not any privateer has been fitted out or any vessel secured for such a purpose, though I have been on a constant watch in anticipation of making such a discovery. I incline strongly to the opinion that they are not fitting out any vessel for privatering purposes in these islands. I do not think they are doing much in the way of procuring material aid of any kind for their cause. They are, I now have reason to believe, getting a few