War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0419 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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lishments for our Government, if desirable, after the present State contracts expire. On the Continent, Messrs. Dayton and Sanford, ministers to France and Belgium, respectively, have been making contracts and agreements of various kinds, of which you are by this time informed. I have communicated with both of those gentlemen, and have offered to assume any engagements they may have made, provided the arms will pass inspection. I have heard from Mr. Sanford this day that he probably cannot secure the guns he thought he could, and I have seen a letter from Mr. Dayton, saying the same thing as to his contract. Upon the arrival of the steamer of the 7th of August, with my credits, I will proceed to the Continent, and expect to be able to secure a quantity of the French sword-bayonet rifled musket. The market, both here and on the Continent, is flooded with rejected arms of all descriptions.

I have the honor to be, respectfully, yours, & c.,

GEORGE L. SCHUYLER.

AUGUSTA, ME., August 16, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

Will hurry as fast as possible, but fear shall not be able to be much in advance of time mentioned.

I. WASHBURNN, JR.,

Governor.

BOSTON, August 16, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

Impossible for us to send five regiments next week. Will try to send two.

JNO. A. ANDREW,

Governor.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Boston, Mass., August 16, 1861.

Colonel LORENZO THOMAS,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

COLONEL: I find myself continually embarrassed by want of information and of directions from the military authorities of the United States as to the duties which, as Governor of this Commonwealth, I am expected to perform in relation to our national military establishment. I refer more particularly at this moment to the matter of appointments to vacancies in the Massachusetts volunteer regiments now serving in the field, and I beg leave to request minute information of the course of business which is expected of me in relation to them. As I understand it at present, I can appoint to no vacancy which is not officially certified to me as existing by the U. S. Adjutant-General from the headquarters at Washington.

But in no single instance has any such vacancy been so certified to me, and yet I am aware that many such vacancies exist, and I am continually entreated by Massachusetts commanders to make appointments to fill them. Within the past week I have received notices from Major-General Butler, from Fort Monroe; from Colonels Couch, Cowdin, and