War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0306 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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Young men of fortune left luxurious homes for the tent and the camp. Native and foreign born alike came forward with a kindred enthusiasm. That a well-disciplined, homogeneous, and efficient force should be formed out of such a seemingly heretogeneous mass appears almost incredible. But what is the actual fact? Experienced men, who have had ample opportunity to familiarize themselves with the condition of Europan armies, concede that in point of personnel this patriot army is fully equal to the finest regular troops of the Old World. A more intelligent body of men, or one actuated by paper motives, was never before marshaled in the field.

The calling forth of this large and admirable force in vindication of the Constitution and the laws is in strict accordance with a wise prudence and economy, and at the same time in perfect harmony with the uniform practice of the Government. But three years ago, when the authority of the nation was contemptuously defied by the Mormons in Utah, the only safe policy consistent with the dignity of the Government was the prompt employment of such an overwhelming force for the suppression of the rebellion as removed all possibility of failure. It will hardly be credited, however, that the following language in relation to that period was penned by John B. Floyd, then Secretary of War, and now leading the rebel forces, who have even less to justify their action than the Mormons:

When a small force was first sent to Utah, the Mormons attacked and destroyed their trains and made ready for a general attack upon the column. When a sufficient power was put on foot to put success beyond all doubt their bluster and bravado sank into whispers of terror and submission. This movement upon that Territory was demanded by the moral sentiment of the country, was due to a vindication of its laws and Constitution, and was essential to demonstrate the power of the Federal Government to chastise insubordination and quell rebellion, however formidable from numbers or position it might seem to be. Adequate preparations and a prompt advance of the Army was an act of mercy and humanity prevented the effusion of blood.

I recommend the same vigorous and merciful policy now.

The reports of the chiefs of the different bureaus of this Department, which are herewith submitted, present the estimates of the probable amount of appropriations required in addition to those already made for the year ending June 30, 1860, for the force now in the field or which has been accepted and will be in service within the next twenty days, as follows:

Quartermaster's Department.........................$70,289,200, 21.

Subsistence Department.............................27, 278, 781.50

Adjutant-General's Department...................... 408, 000.00

Ordnance Department................................ 7,468,172.00

Pay Department.....................................67,845,402.48

Engineer Department................................ 685,000.00

Topographical Engineer Department.................. 50,000.00

Surgeon-General's Department.......................1,271,841.00

Due States which have made advances for troops...10,000,000.00

Total..............................................185,296,396.00

The resistance to the passage of troops through the city of Baltimore, hastening to the relief of the Federal capital, and the destruction of bridges of the Wilmington and Baltimore and the Northern Central Railroads, together with the refusal of the Baltimore and Ohio Company to transport the Government forces and supplies, involved the necessity at an early stage of the present troubles on the part of this Department to take possession of so much of the railway lines as was required to form a connection with the States from which troops and