War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0279 UNION AUTHORITIES.

Search Civil War Official Records

an additional supply of 100,000 at least of the latest pattern, as made at the Springield Armory, and they should be obtained with the least delay possible. The U. S. Armory cannot be relied on now for more than 3,000 muskets per month, and it will be necessary to resort to contracts. In this connection I would respectfully refer to the notes on the subject of contracting for small-arms which were recently prepared here, were commended to your acceptance and firm adherence by Lieutenant-General Scott, and were approved by you. The following extract from those notes indicates the material points to be observed viz:

It is in my opinion decidedly objectionable to enter into contracts for any other arms than those of the regular U. S. patterns. The best and only proper course of be pursued in this matter is, in my opinion, to make no contract now (with any one person) for more than 25,000 arms, with a stringent condition in regard to the time of delivery-I should say an entire forfeiture of the contract. In this way the ability of each contractor to meet his engagements, both as regards time and the quality of his work, will be ascertained, when additional contracts may be given to those who prove themselves worthy of receiving them.

If four contracts for the above number of muskets, to be made exactly according to the latest Springfield pattern so as to interchange in all their parts with arms of that pattern and with each other, can be made and executed in nine months, or as much sooner as possible, it will be advisable to do so. As regards the price, I consider the time of the delivery of the arms as more important than their cost. They can be made for $12 each, including appendages, but a liberal profit on the cost should be allowed. The present cost at the U. S. Armory, is $13.93.

Respectfully, &c.,

JAS. W. RIPLEY,

Lieutenant-Colonel of Ordnance.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, June 19, 1861.

His Excellency O. P. MORTON,

Governor of Indiana:

SIR: By order of the President this Department will, with your consent, accept any number, not exceeding four, additional regiments from your State to serve during the war, and to be selected by you. It is, however, the desire of the President that these regiments shall be made up and taken from the First, Second, and Third Congressional districts of the State, and this order is given with that expectation.

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, June 19, 1861.

His Excellency SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD,

Governor of Iowa:

SIR: This Department, with your approval, will accept, in addition to the two regiments already mustered, four regiments to serve during the war, to wit: One regiment of cavalry, commanded by Colonel Warren, and three regiments of infantry, commanded respectively by Colonels Dodge, Worthington, and McDowell; the cavalry regiment and the infantry regiments commanded by Colonels Worthington and McDowell to be mustered into service at Burlington, and that commanded by Colonel Dodge at Council Bluffs.

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.