War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0192 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 13, 1861.

Governor E. D. MORGAN,

Albany, N. Y.:

DEAR SIR: I have deputed Abraham Van Vechten, esq., to proceed to New York and Albany and communicate to you the views and wishes of this Department in regard to the quota of troops to be furnished by your State, their term of service, and the number to be forwarded immediately to this place.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.

HARRISBURG, PA., May 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

I have the honor to say that our regiments at York and Chambersburg are in excellent condition, and will soon be ready for active service. I suggest that the three regiments in Philadelphia, commanded by Colonels Lyle, Morehead, and Lewis, should be removed from the city. I fear they are becoming demoralized. Their removal to any point out of the city will meet my suggestion.

A. G. CURTIN.

MAY 13, 1861.

His Excellency A. G. CURTIN,

Harrisburg, Pa.:

How many Pennsylvania regiments that have been mustered into service for three months are willing to be remustered for three years?

How many regiments have been mustered into service for three years that are equipped and ready for movement, and have any regiments of this class actually been sent forward?

How many regiments have been mustered in that have not been equipped and have been deemed excess troops by General Patterso? Give the numbers of these particular regiments, and will they serve three years if accepted and provided for now by General Government?

How many regiments are organized in Pennsylvania that have not been mustered into the service of General Government that would be willing to serve three years?

Please aswer the foregoing by telegraph and send copy by mail.

SIMON CAMERON.

POLYTECHNIC COLLEGE OF THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA, Philadelphia, May 13, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I am authorized by members of our advanced class in topographical engineering, who expect to graduate in June, to offer their services to the General Government. Accustomed to field practice, as well as to office work, they will be happy to act in any capacity in which their professional knowledge will best advance the great, all absorbing cause of Union. They are natives of Pennsylvania and other central free States, are in age about twenty-one-say nineteen to twenty-four-and may be relied upon either for instrumental observations, with field transit and level, for mapping and the drawing of plans and eleva-