War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0179 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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HARRISBURG, PA., May 8, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

Your telegram is received. I have prepared a circular to be sent to the colonels of all the regiments not sent forward, embracing and recommending most heartily the suggestions in your dispatch, and requiring immediate report to be made to me by the colonels of the regiments of those willing to change time of service. I presume you will instruct the proper officers to remuster those who are willing to change time of service and to reform the regiments according to term of service.

Any deficiency can readily be made up from the camp here.

A. G. CURTIN,

Governor of Pennsylvania.

MADISON, May 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

How many regiments of men enlisted for three years, unless sooner discharged, will be accepted from Wisconsin? Let me know, if possible, that we may proceed to equip them.

A. W. RANDALL.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST, Troy, N. Y., May 9, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

MY DEAR SIR: Be pleased to accept my grateful acknowledgments for your communication of the 6th instant. It is especially gratifying to learn that my conduct hitherto in relation to the affairs of the Union merits your high approbation. Although I am aware that with the press of business you have but little time to read letters, yet, as my conduct in connection with the Union Defense Committee of the city of New York may not be properly understood or appreciated by all in authority at Washington, I avail myself of this occasion to present you with a condensed history of the part I performed in the forwarding of troops and supplies for the protection and defense of Washington, which at the time was reported to be in imminent peril.

It was under such circumstances that I visited Governor Morgan at Albany on Saturday, the 20th of April, who informed me that Washington was in great danger of being taken possession of by the rebels. Whilst in consultation with him he received a dispatch to hurry troops to Washington. I did not hesitate to advise the most prompt and energetic measures. At the same time I gave orders to Colonel Tompkins, assistant quartermaster-general, to furnish transportation, and Major Eaton, commissary of subsistence, to supply thirty days' rations to the troops ordered by water to Washington.

On Monday, the 22nd ultimo, I repaired to the city of New York. The following day I was visited by General Dix, Messrs. Simeon Draper, Blatchford, Grinnell, General Wetmore, and others of that noble, generous, and patriotic Union Defense Committee. They considered Washington in danger of falling into the hands of the Southern rebels, and no time was to be lost in forwarding troops for its defense, as also supplies. They presented me with their plan to save the capital, which