War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0118 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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and Tortugas that are indispensable to defense and efficiency. Equally necessary is it to push forward the works at Sanby Hook, New York Harbor, where now we are not ready for a single gun, but where by December we may be ready for between forty and fifty 8- inch columbiads most advantageously placed. As regards this last fort, it must be understood that until it can be brought into effect an enemy's squadron can occupy the lower bay of New York and completely seal up the harbor without being under fire of a single gun or mortar. To do what seems to me indispensable will, besides some small grants from time to time for contingent services, and for the conservation of other works, need the following sums for the remaining months of this calendar year, making a total much below the sums appropriated for the works mentioned. And I beg on the part of this great military interest that the Treasury may be willing to meet the corresponding monthly estimates, it being understood that the disbursing officer shall be restricted absolutely to these amounts, and instructed to render their monthly calls lower if possible. I beg the earliest reply, so that i may direct the officers to make the requisite provisions for stopping work or for going on, according to the decision. I cannot take the responsibility of not putting forward this statement of the necessities of the Engineer Department, at the same time promising to keep down other expenditures on fortifications to the lowest possible sum; that is, stopping work thereon, and merely keeping them from damage.

I ask to be authorized to direct engagements for the three fortifications mentioned as stated below for each month till December, inclusive, making a total sum for the three of $213,000.

May.....................................................$14,000 June.................................................... 12,000 July.................................................... 30,000

August.................................................. 30,000

September............................................... 44,000

October.................................................$27,000

November................................................ 27,000

December................................................ 29,000

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Total...................................................213,000

I am, &c.,

JOS. G. TOTTEN,

Brevet Brigadier-General and Colonel of Engineers.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, April 16, 1861.

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD,

Governor of Iowa, Iowa City:

DEAR SIR: Your letter of the 16th and two of the 18th instant are received. Thanking you for the speedy and prompt action you have taken in response to the call of the President for troops, I have to say in answer that it is not contemplated to remove the troops from the State of Iowa that may be raised there, and should that contingency arise, steps have already been taken to see that sufficient arms for the protection of your people shall be furnished.

If it suits your convenience and that of the troops better, the place of rendezvous may be changed from Keokuk to Davenport. Until mustered into the service of the United States the troops will be at the expense of the State. The Federal Government will furnish arms and equipments for the troops. An officer of the U. S. Army will be detailed to inspect the troops at their place of rendezvous and muster them into service. The surgeon, as all other officers for the State militia of the respective States, are appointed or elected under the State authority, according to the laws of each particular State.