War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0113 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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[Indorsements.]

We fully indorse all the above statements, and urge the necessity of immediate action.

J. S. STONE,

Major-General, Kansas Militia.

SAMUEL WALKER,

Major-General, Kansas Militia.

Governor Robinson's statements are the facts in the premises. Living on the border, as I do, I know that if the Department think best not to give us arms to sustain ourselves, if necessary our people will at once lay hold of them. I cannot restrain them.

JAMES L. McDOWELL,

U. S. Marshal.

GENERAL HDQRS., OFFICE OF COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF,

Springfield, Ill., April 25, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: I have just addressed you by telegraph, stating that I was greatly embarrassed by the number of volunteers which have assembled. A less number of men are now being mustered into service in each company than the telegraph announced. To send these men home will have a demoralized effect. Will not the Government accept additional regiments in this State? It is highly important. In my message to the legislature I have recommended the raising of ten regiments in addition to the six regiments which you have authorized. You have directed four regiments to be stationed at Cairo and two or three regiments to support the garrison at Saint Louis Arsenal. Do we not need a requisition for more men, so that we may be prepared to meet any demand of the General Government for any emergency? We are deeply impressed here with the necessity for such a requisition. We have about 1,400 men now in Cairo and thirteen cannon, and are sending munitions forward as rapidly as possible. We except to send two or three regiments to-night or to-morrow to Saint Louis.

At Cincinnati and in Indiana arrangements have been made to stop supplies of provisions and articles of commerce with the South. We have directed the officer in command at Caior to seize munitions of war passing that point, but have not yet assumed the responsibility of preventing commercial intercourse. I would respectfully direct your attention to this subject, and the importance of instructing the officer in command at Cairo with reference to the commerce of the river. The troops that were sent to Cairo have not yet been mustered into service. There was no officer here to perform that duty when your order arrived, and the emergency of the occasion was such that it became necessary to send the troops forward immediately. I hope that an officer will soon be sent to muster them into service, and also one to assume the command at that point, with definite instructions concerning commercial intercourse with the South.

Respectfully, yours,

RICHD. YATES,

Governor.

8 R R - SERIES III, VOL I