War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0102 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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a base for important operations scarcely second to Washington. I have had no communication from Washington since Friday last. The result is that I am compelled to assume extraordinary responsibilities in connection with the troops, and must continue to do so in the absence of regular dispatches.

Respectfully and truly, yours,

W. DENNINSON,

Governor.

MADISON, April 22, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

I have the honor to inform you that the First Regiment of Wisconsin active militia is enrolled and officered, and will be at the command of the Government at Milwaukee on Saturday of the present week.

Very respectfully,

ALEX. W. RANDALL.

SPECIAL ORDER,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 115.

Washington, April 23, 1861.

1. Lieutenant Colonel James W. Ripley, Ordnance Department, is assigned to the charge of that department during the feeble health of its chief, and will enter upon the duties at once.

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3. The amounts found to be due resigned officers from the States which claim to have seceded will be paid the,m from the U. S. funds heretofore sent to or deposited in those States.

By order:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Indianapolis, Ind., April 23, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

We have 6,000 men in camp here, and will have 8,000 men by to- morrow night. Major Wood has mustered three regiments into the service of the United States, and is still engaged in the work. We will have four regiments to-morrow. I will send the four regiments to Evansville, as directed, as early as the first of next week. Has the Government uniforms and clothing prepared for the men - that is, for the six regiments? If so, I want it forwarded at once. The long-range rifled selected, and which were to be furnished on the quota for 1862, have not been seen or heard of. It will take the 5,000 stand of arms which were to be sent to the depot to arm the volunteers now accepted. Can we have more arms sent to the State? On the southern border, along Kentucky, the people are much alarmed, forming companies, and demanding arms, which we have none to give. I am receiving deputations from day to day from the border towns asking arms. They are afraid their property will be destroyed by marauding companies from the other side of the river. I have made a requisition on the Government for twenty-four cannon, long range, large caliber, to which I have