War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0101 UNION AUTHORITIES.

Search Civil War Official Records

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Columbus, Ohio, April 22, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: On the 18th instant I sent you a telegraphed dispatch urgently asking that some heavy guns might be sent from Pittsburg to Cincinnati, to wit: Five 8-inch, five 10-inch, and one 12-inch columbiads; four heavy mortars, with complement of shot and shell; also grape and canister shot for field batteries. I have no reply to the message, and assume that it was intercepted. I also inclose a copy of a dispatch sent on the 20th, which I presume met the same fate.* This last I have since ordered to be taken from Harrisburg by special messenger, and I hope you have received it. Both these matters are of the gravest importance to us, and I hope you will make every effort consistent with duty to accord with both requests. Should your order the guns from Pittsburg for this State, please have them sent to this city in the first instance. Colonel Mansfield can inform you of the condition of our quartermaster's department.

Hoping a speedy reply, I remain, very respectfully,

W. DENNINSON,

Governor of Ohio.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Columbus, Ohio, April 22, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: Owing to an unavoidable confusion in the first hurry and enthusiasm of the movement of our people in Ohio in defense of the Government, I find that I have already accepted, and have in camp, or ready to march instantly to it, a large force than the thirteen regiments named as the contingent of Ohio under the late requisition of the President. Indeed, without seriously repressing the ardor of the people, I can hardly stop short of twenty regiments. My belief has been that they would all be needed, and that the refusal on the part of several border States to supply their quota would make it proper for us to increase the force to that amount at least.

The moral effect of this movement of the people, in advance of our demand upon them, is so great, especially in impressing the insurgent and wearing States with the belief that the lion in us is thoroughly roused, that I am strongly desirous that the President may accept the number of troops I have offered above, i. e., twenty regimens. Is it not wise to make the movement as manifestly an overpowering one that the enemy must cious that their cause is hopeless?

Let me know that I may except in regard to this subject, and if the number of regiments is increased, let me know also what increase it will make in the number of general officers.

In the meantime I will let me organization be made to cover the twenty regiments, and have them make all the progress in drill they can. I need not impress upon you the demoralizing results of disbanding the surplus regiments. You will also see the necessity of authorizing the additional number of brigadier-generals.

As an additional reason for the increase of our quota, I would add that it seems to be a common expectation that southern Ohio must be

---------------

* See p. 95.

---------------