War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0091 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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in regard to the time when the regiment will be at its rendezvous immediately after the assembling of our Legislature, on the 23rd instant. I have no doubt that the regiment will report itself before the time mentioned in your second dispatch- -20th of May.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

MADISON, WIS., April 19, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

Will you accept two more regiments from this State, to rendezvous at Milwaukee at once?

ALEX. W. RANDALL,

Governor of Wisconsin.

MADISON, WIS., April 19, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

Let the President call for 100,000 more men. We have no parties now. The people will not be content to furnish one regiment alone.

ALEX. W. RANDALL,

Governor of Wisconsin.

MADISON, WIS., April 19, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

Let the President call for 100,000 more men. We have no parties now. The people will not be content to furnish one regiment alone.

ALEX. W. RANDALL,

Governor of Wisconsin.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Nashville, Tenn., April 20, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: In refusing to comply with the demand which you have made upon me as Governor of the State of Tennessee for two regiments of militia to aid the Federal Government in subjugating those States which by formal act of their people have dissolved their former Federal relations and instituted for themselves others, I deem it proper that I should state briefly the grounds upon which my action is based.

The sages and patriots of the Revolution, when in the act of severing their connection with the mother country and establishing the great cardinal principles of free government, solemnly declared before the world that governments were instituted among men to secure their rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, deriving their just powers form the consent of the governed; that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends it is the right of the people to abolish it and to institute a new government, laying its foundations on such principles and organizing its powers in such form as to shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evincing a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is theirhrow off such government and to provide new guards for their future safety.

Recognizing and adopting these great principles, the people of Tennessee, in forming their constitution as a free and independent sovereignty preparatory to admission into the Federal Union, incorporated into their Declaration of Rights, as the basis of their superstructure, "That all power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are