War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0074 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., April 16, 1861.

His Excellency the GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS,

Boston, Mass.:

We will muster your regiments after arrival. Send the first ready by rail to this place, and the next by rail to Baltimore, and thence by steam-boat to Fort Monroe, near Norfolk. The third regiment, if there be a third, to follow the first.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 16, 1861.

His Excellency the GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS,

Boston, Mass.:

Send first regiment which is ready by rail here; the second by rail or sea, as you prefer, to Fort Monroe, near Norfolk; the third to follow the first. Reply by telegraph.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

Orders yesterday from War Department for one to take fast steamer to Fort Monroe; the other three to come by rail here. (By dictation from chief clerk War Department.-E. D. T.)

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Council Chamber, April 16, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMORON,

Secretary of War:

We have transportation ample and economical by sea to Washington or Annapolis, safe against all but war risk in Potomac. Annapolis probably free from this to [Fort Monroe?]. Requisition received from you. Except telegraph.

JOHN A. ANDREW,

Governor of Massachusetts.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, April 16, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War, United States, Washington City:

DEAR SIR: Much excitement exists at this time in this State in regard to state of hostilities between our Government and the so- called Southern Confederacy. Our people are willing and anxious to stand by and aid the Administration. Will you be kind enough to inform me immediately whether it is probable that Iowa will be called on by the President for troops, and how many and on what terms and in what way volunteers are usually mustered into the U. S. service? Some fifteen to twenty volunteer companies have already tendered me their services and I am almost daily receding inquiries touching these matters. Be kind enough to give me as much and as early information as possible. One of my purposes in seeking this information is this: Our General Assembly meets biennially. Our last session commenced January, 1860. It may be that an extra session of our General Assembly may be necessary. If so, I will call it promptly; if not, I wish to avoid the unnecessary expense.