War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0064 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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informed on the 4th of February last, by the Chief of the Ordnance Department, that orders had been issued to the U. S. Armory at Harper's Ferry to forward to his address "334 long- range rifles with sword-bayonets and appendages," being the equivalent of 453 muskets, the quota due North Carolina. Up to this date nothing further has ben heard from them, and application is now made directly to you, sir, in the hope that you will cause the matter to receive proper attention without further delay.

With much respect, yours, &c.,

GRAHAM DAVES,

Private Secretary.

WASHINGTON, April 4, 1861.

To the ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT:

The quota of arms for Indiana for the year 1862 may be furnished in one 6-pounder cannon, with carriage and equipage, and the remainder in long-range rifles, with sword-bayonets and necessary accouterments. I shall be very glad if the shipment can be made immediately to Indianapolis. I will have a safe place of deposit for the 5,000 stand of arms to be sent to Indiana in addition by the time they can get there.

O. P. MORTON,

Governor of Indiana.

[Indorsements.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, April 5, 1861.

The issue of arms, &c., in advance to the States being contrary to regulations, the authority of the Secretary of War is required before making it.

H. K. CRAIG,

Colonel of Ordnance.

APRIL 10, 1861.

An order to be issued in this case for anticipation of one year's quota and that they be supplied from a depot to be established at Indianapolis.

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, April 5, 1861.

Honorable S. CAMERON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Referring to the conversation I had the honor to hold with you yesterday on the subject of providing other depots for the more prompt distribution of arms to the militia when called on the aid in the execution of the laws or repel invasion, I have to report that in my opinion a depot of arms at some central point in the State of Indiana, say at its capital, might be of great national importance at this time-the depot building to be tarnished by the State authority or hired by the United States, and, with the stores, to be placed in charge of a military storekeeper or other officer of the Ordnance Department. No issues to be made except under instructions from the War Department, on applications from the Governor of the State. A small store of ammunition only will be required at this depot, as supplies can be promptly sent