War of the Rebellion: Serial 122 Page 0042 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, January 18, 1861.

Honorable JOSEPH HOLT,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Will you p lease inform me what number of improved arms, now recognized as suitable for the service, are now in possession of the Department, and how large a force the Department can now arm with the latest improved arms.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

B. STANTON.

WASHINGTON, January 18, 1861.

Honorable JOSEPH HOLT,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Please send Military Affairs, a copy of the order of the Secretary of War of December 30 [29], 1859, in relation to the distribution of arms, referred to in the letter of Colonel Craig ot you of the 15th instant, and also the orders of January 30, 1860, referred to in the same letter, under which 115,000 stand of arms were distributed to sundry arsenals in the Southern States.

You will also please advise me whether any arms have been distributed to any of the States for the year 1861, and, if so, the number nad description distributed to each, and the date of the distribution.

It has seemed to me that there has been unnecessary delay in answering my former inquiries in relation to the distribution of arms.

You will oblige me, therefore, by furnishing me the information now asked for at your earliest convenience.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

B. STANTON.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 21, 1861.

Honorable B. STANTON,

Chairman Committee on Military Affairs, House of Representatives:

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 18th instant I have the honor to inclose to you a report of the Chief of Ordnance, showing the number of arms in our arsenals a nd armories suitable for the service.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT,

Secretary of War ad interim.

[Inclosures.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, D. C., January 21, 1861.

Honorable J. HOLT,

Secretary of War:

SIR: In answer to the letter of the Honorable B. Stanton of the 8th instant I have to state that it appears by the last returns that there were remaining in the U. S. arsenals and armories as follows: Percussion muskets and muskets altered to percussion (caliber 69), 499,554 and percussion rifles (caliber 54), 42,011; total, 541,565. If from this number are deducted the numbers of the same description that were in the arsenals in South Carolina, Alabama, and Louisiana,