War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0869 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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that Mr. Clay should dare remain in Canada after the passage of thelaw known as the "alien bill," which was passed by the Canadian Parliament in, I think, February preceding.

JAMES MERRILL.

Sworn and acknowledged at Washington, D. C., this 18th of January, 1866, before me.

GEO. C. THOMAS,

Notary Public.

Deposition of James Brown, taken at the same time and place.

The deponent, being sworn, deposes as follows:

Question. Where do you reside?

Answer. At Windsor, Canada West.

Question. Do you know Clement C. Clay? If so, please state when and where and under what circumstances you have seen him.

Answer. I first saw him in the fall of 1864 at the Queen's Hotel, Toronto, Canada. He was then pointed out to me by several rebel refugees and Confederate agents from the United States, who seemed to know him well. I saw him again in the winter of 1864-65, at Windsor, Canada - the first time, I believe, on 17th of January, and later again at the same place. When I saw him the last time he was in company with a Captain Hynes or Hines, and was going toward the depot of the Great Western Railroad.

JAS. BROWN.

Sworn and acknowledged at Washington, D. C., this 18th of January, 1866, before me.

GEO. C. THOMAS,

Notary Public.

HDQRS. MILITARY DISTRICT OF FORT MONROE, VA.,

January 19, 1866.

General E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report no change in the health of prisoenrs Davis and Clay since last report.

I inclose letter from Davis to his wife, which he desires forwarded. Your letter of the 15th ultimo was received to-day. I believe every precaution has been taken to avoid surprise and the utmost vigilance exercised. In addition to guards, &c., I have had detectives constantly on the alert since the prisoners were confined here. If you deem it advisable, I would suggest that tha Districts of Norfolk and Portsmouth be added to my district, as they were during the summer. I can then be better able to watch certain known rebels and ascertain if a secession organization exists there.

I have the honor to remain, with the highest respect,

NELSON A. MILES,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF FORT MONROE,

January 20, 1866.

General E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report the prisoners Clay as well. Davis complains of suffering from neuralgia; otherwise he is well. He