War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0840 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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In view of the facts surrounding the case of Harrison it is feared that the Government would gravely compromise itself by complying with this recommendation, which indeed would be ludicrous were it not for the strange insensibility which it manifest to the revolting guilt with which this man's name is connected. No more reason is perceived for its making merry the Christmas of the confedential agent and satellite of Davis than that of Davis himself. Associate as the two have been in their crimes, their, flight, and their capture, it is but just that they should not be separated in their confinement. No exercise of Executive clemency, therefore, can be advised in this case, and as for the application to be paroled, which invariably accompanies such communications, it can no more be recommended that this should be granted than that a full pardon should be acceded. To ask that faith be reposed in a party resting under imputations not only of the deepest dishonor and the most intense disloyalty, but also of the gravest crime, is, it is submitted, as uncoscionalbe as it would be unfortunate for the Government to favorably consider such a request.

J. HOLT,

Judge-Advocate-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, December 23, 1865-11.35 a. m.

Major General IRVIN MCDOWELL, San Francisco, Cal.:

The President of the United States has remitted the unexecuted portion of the sentence of W. L. Black, one of the Salvador pirates, and directs his release from confinement. Report receipt and execution.

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF FORT MONROE,

December 25, 1865.

Bvt. Major General E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report the health of the prisoners Davis and Clay to be as well as usual. Davis, in consequence of the recent resolutions of Congress in his case, has shown some symptoms of nervousness. Previous to this he seemed to be perfectly indifferent. As the newspaper reports were so favorabel he assumed more the airs of a prince than a prisoner.

I noticed in his cell the reports of the evidence in the case of Wirz, which he had carefully preserved.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

NELSON A. MILES,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,

Washington, D. C., December 28, 1865.

His Excellency A. JOHNSTON, President of the United States:

SIR: Application having been made to me for an extension of the limits to which Mrs. Jefferson Davis is now confined so as to permit her to go where she pleases in the United States or Canada without