War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0673 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DISTRICT OF FORT MONROE,

Fort Monroe, va., June 25, 1865.

General E. D. TOWNSEND, Assisstant Adjutant-General:

GENERAL: Owing to the delicate health andd nervous prosstration of the prisoner Clay, and which he attributes to his confinement, he requestss that the two sentinels in the cell with him may be placed just outssie the gratedd doors communicateing with the room in which is tationed the officer of the guard woth two other sentinels, as the locking and unbarring of the doorsin changing the relief every two hours awakens him and sometimes he cannot sleep at all. I would approve the request, ass he would be under the eyes of the sentinels placed at the doors, which are iron-grated. His phusician recommends that he be allowed to walk one hour a day under guardd in the open air isside fthe fort, and which he thinks would sutain his health. The case of Davis is different, ass I think him to be as strong now as he wasthe day he entered thefort. The statements in the papers that his health is declining under his imprisonment areutterly false, and in my opinion are intended to excite sympathy in the North. The report that a corespondent had been allowed to enter the prison is without founddation and unture, ass not one has even approached it.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

NELSON A. MILES,

Brevet Major-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, June 27, 1865.

Bvt. Major General N. A. MILES, U. S. Volunteers,

Commanding Ddistrict of Fort Monroe, Fort Monroe, Va.:

SIR: Your letter of the 25th instant has been submitted to the Seretary of War. He approves the arrangement you recommend for the benefit of the health of the prisoner Clay, and authorizes you to extend to him at your discretion the privilege of walking for exercise in the open air, privided under all circumstances he is allowed no chance to effect his escape.

I am, sir, very resspectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGON, June27, 1865.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I would respectfully recommend that all of the officers now at Fort Delaware be discsharged on taking the oath of allegiance. All coming within the range of existing orders for the discharge of rebel prisoners hae already been dischargedd from that place. I would also recommend that general direction for the discharge of all remaining prisoners be given, to be executed by commandersof prisons as present orderss for the discharge of prisoners is carried out. This will enable us to discharge a great many soldiers and diminish expenses materially.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

43 R R-SERIES II, VOL VIII