War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0632 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

wounded. The essential conditions and causes of the disease under consideration are of various kinds, such as deprivation of the blood, overcrowded hospitals, a lack of proper cleanliness, and insufficient ventilation. In fact, anything which would cause other diseases of a low form might be enumerated as causes of this truly formidable disease.

The last question we will not attempt to anser at this time. We have not performed a sufficient number of post-mortem examinations of patients who have died from this and other diseases to entitle us to speak positively as to any peculiar "local lesions which are characteristic of this disease."

We will therefore close this already too lengthy paper, hoping that it may in some way assist you in making your report to the Surgeon-General, and thereby prove of some benefit to the profession and the country.

GENERAL COURT-MARTIAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Numbers 260.

Washington, June 1, 1865.

I. Before a general court-martial which convened at Washington, D. C., May 2, 1865, pursuant to Special Orders, Numbers 196, dated War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, May 1, 1865, and of which Major General J. G. Foster, U. S. Volunteers, is president, was arraigned and tried-

Benjamin G. Harris, citizen.

CHARGE: Violation of the 56th Article of War.

Specification 1.-In this, that Benjamin G. Harris, a citizen of Maryland and a member of the Congress of the United States, did relieve, with money, to wit, the sum of $2.00, the public enemy, to wit, Sergt. Richard Chapman and Private William Read, of Company K, Thirty-second Regiment Virginia Infantry, soldiers of the Army of the so-caled Confederate States of America, then in rebellion against and at war with the United States, he, the said Harris, then and there well knowing said Chapman and Read to be soldiers of said Army, and treating and offering to relieve them as such, and at the same time advising and inciting them to continue in said Army and to make war against the United States, and emphatically declaring his sympathy with the enemy and his opposition to the Government of the United States in its efforts to suppress the rebellion. This at or near Leonardtown, Saint Mary's County, Md., on or about April 26, 1865.

Specification 2.-In this, that Benjamin G. Harris, a citizen of Maryland and a member of the Congress of the United States, did knowingly harbor and protect the public enemy, to with, Sergt. Richard Chapman and Private William Read, of Company K, Thirty-second Regiment Virginia Infantry, soldiers of the Army of the so-called Confederate States of America, then in rebellion against and at war with the United States, by procuring them to be lodged and fed in a private house, and furnishing them with money therefor, he the said Harris, then and there well knowing said Chapman and Read to be soldiers of said Army, and treating them, and offering and giving them money as such, and at the same time advising and inciting them to continue in said Army and to make war against the United States, and emphatically declaring his sympathy with the enemy and his opposition to the Government of the United States in its efforts to suppress the rebellion. This at or near Leonardtown, Saint Mary's County, Md., on or about April 26, 1865.

To which charge and specification the accused, Benjamin G. Harris, citizen, pleaded not guilty.

FINDING.

The court, having maturely considered the evidence adduced, finds the accused, Benjamin G. Harris, citizen, as follows:

Of the first specification, guilty.

Of the second specification, guilty, except as to the words, "and fed in a private house."

Of the charge, guilty.

SENTENCE.

And the court does therefore sentence him, Benjamin G. Harris, citizen, to be forever disqualified from holding any office or place of honor, trust, or profit under the