War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0521 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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[APRIL 29-JUNE 11, 1865.-For reports and correspondence relating to surrender or Confederate forces under M. Jeff. Thompson, see Series I, Vol. XLVIII, Parts I and II.]

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI,

New Orleans, La., April 29, 1865.

Colonel IG. SZYMANSKI,

Asst. Agent of Exchange, Trans-Mississippi Dept., C. S. Army:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that I have about 200 Confederate prisoners at my disposal, and propose leaving here Monday evening, May 1, or Tuesday morning, May 2, for Red River Landing, to deliver them to you.

In hopes that you may have some U. S. prisoners to deliver to me,

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. H. STERLING,

Captain and Agent of Exchange, Mil. Div. of West Mississippi.

WASHINGTON, April 30, 1865.

Major General J. J. REYNOLDS, Little Rock, Ark.:

You may release the prisoners you have on their taking the amnesty oath and oath of allegiance, exercising your discretion about those who should not have this privilege extended to them. Invite every one to lay down their arms on the same terms, except you will only parole those who do not come within the President's amnesty proclamation.

U. A. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS, HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

NO.47.

New Orleans, April 30, 1865.

Paroled prisoners of war within the limits of the Department of the Gulf will not be allowed to bear arms or to appear in public in the uniform of the rebel army. The provost-marshal-general is directed to enforce a strict observance of this order.

By command of Major-General Banks:

J. SCHUELER CROSBY,

Bvt. Lieutenant Colonel, Aide-de-Camp and Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

WASHINGTON CITY, D. C., May 1, 1865.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Since the resumption of exchanges we have received about 34,000 returned Union prisoners. There were estimated to be about 11,000 to be returned. These were to be delivered at points on the Atlantic and the Mississippi River, but the actual delivery has not been under our control, and it has only through newspapers that we have understood that about 5,000 were to be delivered at Darien, Ga. They, when delivered, were to be sent to Camp Parole, at Annapolis, Md., under the direction of the commanding officer at Darien. They have not yet been reported as delivered even at Darien.