War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0502 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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37 BLEECKER STREET, New York City, April 21, 1865.

COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: A telegraph addressed to General Paine, whom I have relieved, asking him to notify General Beall of the fact that 6,000 rebel prisoners had arrived at Newport Nexs needing supplieds, was duly received. In reply I have the honor to state that I am informed by General Beall that [owing to] the late fall in the price of cotton, &c., his funds are too much reduced to render to render material assistance. He refers a request made by Mr. Ould that the number of bales forwarded be permitted to be increased to 1,500, which if complied with would enable him to increase the supplies.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. O. TYLER.

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

GENERAL ORDERS, HDQRS. NOTHERN DEPARTMENT,

NO.30.

Cincinnati, Ohio, April 21, 1865.

I. Before a military commission, which convened at Cincinnati, Ohio, January 11, 1865, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 278, series of 1864, and Nos.4 and 8, current series, from these headquarters, and of which Colonel Charles D. Murray, Eighty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, is president, were arraigned and tried-

Charles Walsh, Buckner S. Morris, Vincent Marmaduke, and R. T. Semnes, citizens.

CHARGE I: Conspirking, in violation of the laws of war, to release the rebel prisoners of war confined by authority of the United States at Camp Douglas, near Chicago, Ill.

Specification.-In this, that they, the said Charles Walsh, Buckner S. Morris, Vincent Marmaduke, R. T. Semnes, Charles Travis Daniel, George E. Cantril, G. St. Leger Grenfel, and Benjamin M. Anderson, did unlawfully and secretly conspirite and agree among themselves, and with one Captain Hines, so called, allia Doctor Hunter, of the Confederate Army, and other, in violation of the laws of war, to release the rebel prisoners of war then confined by authority of the United States at Camp Douglas, near Chicago, Ill., numbering between 8,000 and 9,000 persons, by suddently attacking said camp on or about the evening of the 8th of November, anno Domini 1864, with a large number of armed men, overpowering the guard and forces then and there stationed and on duty, seizing the cannon and arms in the possession of said guard and forces for the purpose of guard and defending said camp, forcibly opening the gates of said prison camp and removing all obstructions to the successful escape of said prisoners confined within its limits. This, at or near Chicago, in the State of Illinois, within the military lines and the theater of military operations of the Army of the United States, at a period of war and armed rebellion against the authority of the United States, and on or about the 1st day of November, anno Domini 1864.

CHARGE II: Conspiring, in violation of the laws of war, to lay waste and destroy the city of Chicago, Ill.

Specification.-In this, that they, the said Charles Waslh, Buckner S. Morris, Vincent Marmaduke, R. T. Semmens, Charles Travis Daniel, George E. Cantril, G. St. Leger Grenfel, and Benjamin M. Anderson, did unlafully adn secretely conspire and agree amon themselves, and with one Captain Hines, so called, alias Doctor Hunter, of the Confederate Army, and others, in violation of the laws of war, to lay waste and destroy, on or about the evening of the 8th of November, anno Domini 1864, the city of Chicago, Ill., by capturing the arsenal in said city, cutting the telegraph wires, buring the railroad depots, taking forcible possession of the banks and public buildings, and leaving the city to be sacked, pillage, and burned by the rebel prisoners of war confined at Camp Douglas, near Chicago, Ill., which prisoners were to be forcibly released by them on or about the date above mentioned. This, at or near Chicago, in the State of Illinois, within the military lines and the theater of military operations of the Army of the United States, at a period of war and armed rebellion against the authority of the United States, and on or about the 1st day of November, anno Domini 1864.

To which each of the accused pleaded not guilty.