War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0484 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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an equivalent here or notice of one having been delivered to them on the James River. Will you please order 5,000 Confederates or their equivalents sent here from the Western prisons, or a delivery to be made on the James, and send official notice here? Captain G. A. Williams, commissary of musters, will await your answer at Cairo, and is able to make such explanations as you may require.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. J. T. DANA,

Major-General.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. WILLIAMS,

Captain, First U. S. Infty., Commissary of Musters, Dept. of Miss.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., April 10, 1865.

Major General G. WEITZEL, Commanding, &c., Richmond, Va.:

I have the honor to inclose herewith copies of the several orders which have been issued from the War Department in reference to the control of prisoners of war, and I respectfully request the necessary instructions may be given to the provost-marshal in Richmond to carry out these orders. I will cause him to be supplied with all necessary blanks and copies of the within orders. The same regulations are observed at hospitals of prisoners of war as at prison stations, and for the greater convenience I request that the provost-marshal who has the charge of prisoners of war in Richmond may include in his reports all prisoners in hospital.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Bvt. Brigadier General, U. S. Army, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., April 10, 1865.

Major JOHN C. GRAY, Jr., U. S. Volunteers, Hilton Head, S. C.:

MAJOR: You are directed to proceed upon the steamer Anna Maria to Darien, Ga., and receive thereat such of our officers and soldiers now prisoners of war as the so-called Confederate military authorities may deliver to you and may parole for future exchange according to any arrangements which have been or may be made between Lieutenant-General Grant, U. S. Army, and the so-called Confederate authorities. You will carefully muster the officers and men so received, verify the rolls which accompany them, and receipt for them as paroled prisoners of war subject to be exchanged hereafter according to the terms stated above and not liable to be recaptured until regularly exchanged. You will arrange with the officer in charge of the flag of truce that the camp stores, vessels, officers, guards, and civilian employes under your control shall be protected by your flag of truce from capture or hostile molestation so long as the paroled prisoners remain at Darien and sufficiently long thereafter to enable all the stores and men to be removed. You will see that the limits protected by your flagof turce are large enough to furnish sufficient wood, water, and room for the proper exercise of the paroled prisoners. You will send the paroled prisoners whom you may receive to Hilton Head as rapidly as your means of transportation will allow, turning them over