War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0483 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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HDQRS. TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT,

OFFICE ASSISTANT AGENT OF EXCHANGE,

FLAG-OF-TRUCE BOAT GENERAL HODGE,

Mouth of Red River, April 9, 1865.

Captain W. H. STERLING,

Agent of Exchange and Commissary of Prisoners,

Military Division of West Mississippi:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to inform you that in obedience to inclosed order from the general commanding Trans-Mississippi Department I shall, after the delivery at Alexandria, La., of the C. S. prisoners received from you this day, immediately return to this place and await further action.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

IG. SZYMANSKI,

Asst. Agent of Exchange, Trans-Mississippi Dept., C. S. Army.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT,

Shreveport, La., April 3, 1865.

Major IG. SZYMANSKI, Assistant Agent of Exchange:

The general commanding directs that you proceed to the mouth of Red River with flag of truce for the purpose of conducting the exchange of prisoners agreed upon on July 28, 1864. If the Helena and Donaldsonville prisoners are not yet ready for delivery you are directed to remain at or near the mouth of Red River until you receive a definite answer concerning them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. BOGGS,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

[APRIL 10, 1865.--For agreement in regard to the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, see Series I, Vol. XLVI, Part III, p. 685.]

MEMPHIS, April 10, 1865.

Brigadier-General TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: Pursuant to instructions from Major-Generals Canby and Dana, I have to report that there are in the neighborhood of Vicksburg about 4,700 Union prisoners awaiting exchange, of which seventy-four are Government employes and thirty-nine citizens; the remainder soldiers. The rebel commissioner agrees to release the thirty-nine citizens unconditionally, but refuses to deliver the others to be paroled and sent to Benton Barracks, as he does not know the terms of Lieutenant-General Grant's cartel, and his communication with his Government is cut off. The general directs me to telegraph for instructions how to act in the case.

On the 5th of April Major-General Dana forwarded the following telegram to Lieutenant-General Grant, but on account of his recent movements and the pressing need of the prisoners he directed me to telegraph it to you and ask a reply:

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF MISSISSIPPI,

Vicksburg, Miss., April 5, 1865.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT:

The Confederates have about 5,000 of our men in camp under flag of truce about four miles from here, which they refuse to deliver to us on parole unless they receive