War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0358 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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U. S. MILITARY PRISON,

Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Ind., March 5, 1865.

Colonel A. A. STEVENS, Commanding Camp Morton:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at this station for the week ending March 4, 1865:

Conduct - good. Cleanliness - good. Clothing - good. Bedding - good. State of quarters - good. State of mess houses - have none. State of kitchen - good. Food, quality, of - first class. Food, quantity of - sufficient, being in accordance to orders. Water - sufficient. Sinks - sufficient. Police of grounds - good. Drainage - complete. Police of hospital - thorough. Attendance of sick - good. Hospital diet - first class. General health of prisoners - improving. Vigilance of guard - strict.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. DAVIDSON,

First Lieutenant, Veteran Reserve Corps, Inspecting Officer.

HDQRS. SECOND Brigadier, FIRST DIV., 24TH ARMY CORPS,

Wilmington, N. C., March 5, 1865.

Major J. A. CAMPBELL, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: Having been detailed as special agent to receive Federal prisoners of war by Special Orders, Numbers 12, dated headquarters Department of North Carolina, Army of the Ohio, Wilmington, N. C., February 25, 1865, and having completed those duties, I have the honor to forward herewith the rolls of those recieved and to submit the following brief report:

The delivery of prisoners to me commenced to Sunday, February 26, and was closed on Saturday, March 4. In this time prisoners were received as follows: Enlisted men, 7,692; commissioned officers, 992; total, 8,684. Of the enlisted men 120 were colored. These officers and men were as rapidly as possible, after having received rations and medical attention at the field hospital, moved to Wilmington and delivered to the provost-marshal.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH C. ABBOTT,

Brevet Brigadier-General and Special Agnet of Exchange.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, Mo., March 5, 1865.

Captain JOSEPH McC. BELL,

Asst. Adjt. General, Mil. Div. of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to inform the major-general commanding the Military Division of the Missouri that there are some 250 men in confinement at Alton, Ill., known as the "galvanized Yankees," i. e., men who were taken prisoners by the enemy during the last year, and who, to avoid starvation and death, enlisted in Burke's battalion, of the Confederate Army, and who in the recent raid deserted on the approach of our forces to us. These men have already applied to be sent back to their regiments, but it is not considered safe to sent them where they will be in danger of capture by the enemy. There are also 1,000 prisoners of war and conscripts who refuse to be exchanged - claim to be deserters, unwilling conscripts, &c. These men have applied to enlist in our army. I respectfully submit if we had not better organize