War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0312 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPT.,

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Richmond, Va., February 26, 1865.

Lieutenant General R. S. EWELL,

Commanding Department of Richmond, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: It has been represented to the Secretary of War that the prisoners received on yesterday from the U. S. authorities are greatly scattered between the city and Varina, and undergoing much suffering from sickness and other causes, if not neglect. He therefore directs that you will immediately detail a competent energetic officer to inquire into the matter and ascertain the causes of this state of things. He will also ascertain their wants, have them relieved, and superintend their transportation to Richmond. When this is done he will make a full report of his inpspetion through you to this office without delay.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN W. RIELY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS C. S. MILITARY PRISON,

Camp Sumter, Ga., February 26, 1865.

Lieutenant G. W. McPHAIL,

Aide-de-Camp and [Acting] Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: I have the honor to call your attention to the following facts: There are a large number of paroled prisoners of war who are doing work for the Government which if not done by them would have to be done by impressment or other hire and thus be a heavy wxpense to the Government. These men are, almost without exception, barefooted, having been so long at work that what shoes they had are entirely worn out. I wish to know if I cannot be authorized to make a requisition on the Quartermaster's Department to supply their wants in this line, or else buy the leather through the quartermaster and have the shoes made, as there are plenty of shoemakers among the prisoners.

Recommending the statement to your favorable consideration,

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. WIRZ,

Captain, Commanding Prison.

HEADQUARTERS C. S. MILITARY PRISON,

Camp Sumter, Ga., February 26, 1865.

Lieutenant G. W. McPHALL,

Aide-de-Camp and [Acting] Assistant Adjutant-General:

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to call your attention to the numerous applications which are made to me for Federal money by persons having relations in Northern prisons, whom it is their desire to relieve. Last year General Winder gave me instructions to the effect that the Commissary and Qartermaster Generals had granted sutlers of Federal prisons the privilege of buying "greenbacks" from prisoners at the rate of $4.50 "Confed." for $1 "greenback." All "greenbacks" so obtained to be turned over to the Government. Since then the depreciation of currency has raised the price of Federal money so that it can be bought no more by the sutler at the prescribed price, and led to an illegal outside trade by persons connected with the prison. All