War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0291 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., February 22, 1865.

Captain W. T. HARTZ,

Asst. Adjt. General to Com. General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

CAPTAIN: The object of my telegram of the 18th instant was to inquire whether prisoners of war under charges and held for trial at this place, but not in irons or in close confinement, are comprehended in the spirit of General Orders, Numbers 6, current series, War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, not coming within the letter of the order. There are in this prison at the present time the following prisoners belonging to this class: A. D. Braswell, private, Company C, Eighth Kentucky (rebel) Cavalry, captured in Overton County, Tenn., April 19, 1864, charged with murder of two Federal soldiers after surrender; Milton Dotson, private, Company C., Perrin's Mississippi cavalry, captured at Powder Springs, Ga., November 4, 1864, who was returned from Camp Douglas to be held subject to the orders of Major-General Thomas, with a view of his being executed in retaliation for the murder of the Federal soldiers by Dotson's command; James M. Jones, private, Company E, Third Kentucky (rebel) Cavalry, captured in Morgan County, Ky., November 25, 1863, charged with being a guerrilla; Jesse Thorp, alias Tillett, private, Company A, First Kentucky (rebel) Battalion of Cavalry, captured at Kingsport, Tenn., December 13, 1864, charged with violation of his oath. Should they be forwarded to Colonel Mulford at Fortress Monroe?

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

STEPHEN E. JONES,

Captain and Additional Aide-de-Camp.

U. S. MIL. PRISON, GRATIOT STREET, HOSPITAL DEPT.,

Saint Louis, Mo., February 22, 1865.

Colonel J. H. BAKER,

Provost-Marshal-General, Department of the Missouri:

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the 21st instant Robert Reed, a prisoner of war and a patient in Ward A of this hospital, while standing before one of the windows facing the west, was shot by one of the guards, the ball passing through the right leg and producing a compound comminuted fracture of the tibia and fibula, necessitating amputation of the same below the knee. The ball in its course passed within a few inches of Corporal Ray, of the Veteran Reserve Corps, on duty in the ward at the time. Notwithstanding repeated remonstrances against this practice of indiscriminately shooting through the hospital windows, it is stubbornly persisted ink, at the risk of every one in the hospital ward. But only this morning, after the painful disaster of yesterday, one of the guards at the same post drew up his gun to fire at Hospital Steward Leslie, at the time engaged in lowering the window for the purpose of ventilation. Upon an informal investigation it is denied by the officers of the prison that any orders have been issued sustaining the shooting through the windows, unless a demonstration to break through or escape is attempted; whereas the guards to the number of three or four, and especially the one who shot the prisoner yesterday, stoutly and persistently insists that he conformed strictly to the orders received from his superior officers, and that he was instructed to shoot any one approaching the window, and especially should one or more approach the window at the same time. It