War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0265 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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It is proper to state that Captain Goodman's (the post quartermaster) excuse for not furnishing fuel is that transportation on the railroad, on which he depended, has been interrupted. For the same reason he alleges he could not get lumber to make bunks; and the straw, he says, he could not get. This country abounds in the latter article. For a county as full of wood as this, energy and methodized industry would have formed a depot to provide for such contingencies as a temporary failure or supplies.

His main employment is to furnish these troops and prisoners. Forage is collected by Captain Hanes, assistant quartermaster, here for that purpose, and the resources of the country are abundant in labor and material to furnish everything requisite.

I have waited for two months in hopes that I could remedy these evils, but my authority over staff officers being only as inspector under General Orders, Numbers 48, Adjutant and Inspector General's Office, series 1864, I am powerless. I therefore urgently and respectfully ask that he be relieved at once. The evils are pressing and need instant remedy.

He is an intelligent officer, but needs the industry, energy, and method necessary for such a trust as this. He is, unfortunately, unable to co-operate in harmony with the other staff officers at this post, and his efficiency, for this reason, is impaired if not destroyed.

His report of employees or February 15 shows 27 exempts, light-duty men, conscripts, &c., employed as clerks, mechanics, &c., and 83 negroes, teamsters, laborers, &c., besides a fatigue party of from 40 to 60 men from the troops constantly employed in cutting wood. This force is from than ample to do everything necessary to be done if properly managed. I cannot be responsible for the troops committed to my charge and the lives and safe-keeping or prisoners without a change is made in this office, and this officer relieved.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BRADLEY T. JOHNSON,

Brigadier-General.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS POST, Richmond, February 21, 1865.

Respectfully forwarded approved. It is believed that one quartermaster (Major Morfit) is alone sufficient for this post.

W. M. GARNDER,

Brigadier-General.

[Second indorsement.]

BUREAU ADJT. AND INSP. General, APPOINTMENT OFFICE,

March 2, 1865.

Respectfully referred to the Quartermaster-General.

By command of the Secretary of War:

ED. A. PALFREY,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Third indorsement.]

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE, March 9, 1865.

Respectfully returned to the Adjutant and Inspector General with the remark that Major M. Morfit has been heretofore ordered to assume the duties of post quartermaster at Salisbury, N. C. Captain Goodman, who is regarded as an efficient officer, has been directed to repair to Chester, S. C., with a view to his assignment to duty at that point. Captain M. J. Bearden has been assigned to duty with reserve forces at Salisbury.

A. R. LAWTON,

Quartermaster-General.