War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0234 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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be. If they had reported at any parole camp they would have been declared exchanged long since. I hope I am not uncharitable in stating that they know that fact very well. If they can be made to report at any parole camp, leaving their name, I can embrace them in my next declaration of exchange. The military authorities must of course judge as to the propriety of the furlough. Will they come back after furlough upon a notification of their exchange? If not, we waste the powder of their equivalents.

[RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.]

CHARLOTTE, February 15, 1865.

General B. T. JOHNSON:

The prisoners have just arrived. Guard broke down. If possible, permit your men to remain until morning.

W. J. HOKE,

Colonel, &c.

[Indorsement.]

Answer: You can keep them, but return them in the morning.

FLORENCE, February 15, 1865.

Captain G. W. BOOTH, Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have been ordered by Colonel Forno, at Columbia, to move the prisoners to that point. No trains can pass through Kingsville unless they go to-day. This is impossible. Shall I ship them to North Carolina?

J. F. IVERSON,

Lieutenant-Colonel, &c.

[Indorsement.]

FEBRUARY 16, 1865.

Obey Colonel Forno's orders. He is in charge in South Carolina.

G. W. BOOTH.

CITY POINT, VA., February 16, 1865-10.30 p. m.

Major General E. A. HITCHCOCK:

I see it stated in the papers that where some prisoners in the West were paraded to be sent forward for exchange, those who preferred Northern prisons to a return to the rebel service were invited to step to the front. I think this wrong. Those who do not wish to go back are the ones whom it is most desirable to exchange. If they do not wish to serve in the rebel army they can return to us after exchange and avoid it.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

[Indorsement.]

Referred to General Halleck for report.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.