War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0203 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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agents in New York for the benefit of your prisoners. The cotton will be ready for delivery at an early day. I will thank you to instruct your military authorities near Mobile to notify Major-General Maury of the time when they will be ready to receive it.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. OULD,

Agent of Exchange.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. MILITARY PRISON,

Camp Morton, near Indianapolis, Ind., February 10, 1865.

Captain W. T. HARTZ,

Asst. Adjt. General, Office Com. General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that, in pursuance of instructions received by telegram from the Commissary-General of Prisoners, dated Washington, D. C., February 4, 1865, I have carefully examined all prisoners of war confined in this camp from the five States mentioned in said telegram, viz, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Louisiana, 1,882 in number, and can find out of that number but 366 who want to go on exchange. The remaining 1,516 express freely their desire to remain in prison until such time as they can be released by taking the oath as prescribed in the President's proclamation, December 8, 1863.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. A. STEVENS,

Colonel Fifth Regiment Vet. Reserve Corps, Commanding Camp Morton.

[First indorsement.]

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D. C., February 15, 1865.

Respectfully referred to Major General H. W. Halleck, Chief of Staff, for his information.

W. HOFFMAN,

Bvt. Brigadier General, U. S. Army, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

FEBRUARY 15, 1865.

The Secretary of War directs that those who do not wish to be exchanged be retained at camp until further orders.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

OFFICE EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS,

Mobile, February 10, 1865.

Colonel C. C. DWIGHT, Agent of Exchange, New Orleans:

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of 30th of January, and to thank you for the inclosed permission to three children of Mrs. Cobb to pass into your lines.

I would request that, to avoid unnecessary delay in the bay, you notify me a day or two in advance of your coming with the prisoners whom you are to deliver to me. I have not been advised of the delivery of Admiral Buchanan into our lines, but trust and suppose that his delivery will be made previous to or at least simultaneously with the delivery by Major Szymanski of the naval prisoners whom he holds in Texas. I trust that you will also deliver to me the prisoners whom you