War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0170 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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Federals in the stockade and our guards are light. The sanitary condition of the Federal stockade is even worse than that of the Confederate. The officers propose to erect their own quarters in such place as may be allotted them,if none can be had on the ground.

In absence of Captain J. H. Trezevant:

JNO M. MOREY,

Post Adjutant.

CITY POINT, VA., February 2, 1865- 11.30 a. m.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I am endeavoring to make arrangements to exchange about 3,000 prisoners per week. This is as fast and probably faster than they can be delivered to us. Please have facilities given Lieutenant- Colonel Mulford to get rebel prisoners to comply with this arrangement. I would like disabled troops (troops from Missouri, Kentucky, Arkansas, Tennessee,a nd Louisiana) sent first, as but few of these will be got in the ranks again,and as we can count upon but little re- enforcement from the prisoners we get.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant- General.

HEADQUARTERS FOR WARREN,

Boston Harbor, February 2, 1865.

Hon. GIDEON WELLES,

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: In pursuance of instructions received from the Navy Department the officers and seamen of the insurgent steamer Florida were released yesterday, the 1st instant, upon their complying with the express conditions, and embarked on the steamer Canada for Europe.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. A. ALLEN,

Major, Second U. S . Artillery, Commanding Post.

CITY POINT, VA., February 2, 1865.

Lieutenant-Colonel MULFORD, Steamer New york:

Inform Colonel Hatch, who is now on his way to see you, that all Confederate prisoners confined in cells or in irons have been ordered to Fort Monroe, subject to your orders, for the purpose of carrying out the proposition made by Colonel ould. Ask that a corresponding order may be made for Federal prisoners,a nd that they be brought to Richmond, so that the exchange may be speedily made. You may also make arrangements for exchanging 3,000 prisoners per week, or as many as can be delivered on each side. I think 3,000 probably is as many as can be delivered weekly, until arrangements better than now exist can be made for transporting them. Let your arrangements look to an exchange man for man until the party having the fewest prisoners is exhausted of all on hand.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.