War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0145 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

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that is necessary. Sinks - very clean; washed every morning. Police of grounds - good. Drainage - good. Police of hospital - fair. Attendance of sick - all that is necessary. Hospital diet - good. General health of prisoners - good. Vigilance of guard - thorough.

Remarks and suggestions.

Whole number of prisoners last report...................... 11,436

Whole number of prisoners died since last report........ 83

Whole number of prisoners released since last report... 41

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Total decrease............................................. 124

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Total number of prisoners present.......................... 11,312

I respectfully recommend that the sutler be directed to keep constantly on hand and for sale to the prisoners onions and cabbage whenever they can be procured.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WELLS SPONABLE,

Captain and Inspection Office.

HEADQUARTERS SHIP ISLAND, MISS., SEVENTY-FOURTH U. S. COLORED INFANTRY,

January 29, 1865.

COMMISSARY - GENERAL OF PRISONERS;

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at this station for the week ending January 29, 1865:

Conduct - very good indeed. Cleanliness - strict orders are generally attended to. Clothing - scanty; United States Government has, however, furnished some lately. Bedding - straw. State of quarters - second hand A tents. State of mess-house - none. State of kitchen - good . Food, quality of - good. Food, quantity of - plenty. Water - good. Sinks - well attended to. Police of grounds -good. Drainage - good. Police of hospital - good. Attendance of sick - good. Hospital diet - attended to. General health of prisoners - good at present. Vigilance of guard - admirable.

[Indorsement.]

Lieutenant John Ahlefeldt, who was acting assistant commissary of prisoners, has been relieved and ordered to report to his company for duty, and having only a few officers for garrison duty I have not yet appointed any one to take his place. The officer of the prisoners' guard sends into these headquarters every morning an inspection report stating therein how he receives, in what condition he has the camp turned over to him. If desired, I shall forward these daily report as long as I have no commissary of prisoners. I find things work better here without any such assistance, especially as the commanding officer is held responsible for everything. Blankets and better tents or some means to get lumber to build quarters are very are very much needed. I have 200,000 feet of lumber and over 300 cords of wood on Cat Island, but no light-draft steamer to bring them here.

Respectfully referred to the Commissary - General of Prisoners.

ERNEST W. HOLMSTEDT,

Colonel 74th U. S. Colored Infantry, Commanding Ship Island, Miss.

10 R R - SERIES II, VOL VIII