War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0144 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.

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U. S. MILITARY PRISON,

Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Ind., January 29, 1865.

Colonel A. A. STEVENS, Commanding Camp Morton:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at this station for the week ending January 28, 1865:

Conduct - good. Cleanliness - good. State of clothing - good. Bedding - good. State of quarters - kept well policed. State of mess-house - have none. State of kitchen - good. Food, quality of - first class. Food, quantity of - sufficient, being in accordance to orders. Water - sufficient. Sinks - sufficient for cold weather. Police of grounds - covered with snow and ice all week. Drainage - complete. Police of hospital - good. Attendance of sick - good. Hospital diet - first class. General health of prisoners - bad and fatality great. Vigilance of guard - very strict.

Remarks and suggestions. - I would respectfully suggest that, owing to the barracks in this camp being badly constructed for cold weather and the weather being so extremely cold, the sickness has increased very rapidly in the past week and the casualties have been very heavy. Also that the new hospital wards under construction are completed and are being occupied by the sick in camp, but unfortunately there is not sufficient room in them for the sick in camp, and, in my opinion, at least three additional wards are still needed to contain them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. DAVIDSON,

First Lieutenant, Veteran Reserve Corps, Inspecting Office.

[Indorsement.]

Captain W. T. HARTZ,

Asst. Adjt. General, Office Commissary - General of Prisoners:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to state that the instructions from your office for the construction of additional hospital wards at this camp have just been received and will be complied with as early as possible. Much of the sickness amongst the prisoners at this camp is in my opinion, to be attributed to the barracks being low and poorly ventilated and without floors, originally constructed for cattle stalls and State fair purposes, and should, in my opinion, be removed from their present location to a more central portion of the camp and reconstructed with floors, &c.

Respectfully referred to the Commissary - General of Prisoners.

A. A. STEVENS,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS CAMP DOUGLAS,

Chicago, Ill., January 29, 1865.

Colonel B. J. SWEET,

Eighth Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps, Commanding Post of Chicago:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at this station for the week ending January 28, 1865:

Conduct - good. Cleanliness - good. Clothing - all that is necessary. Bedding - all that is necessary, except blankets. state of quarters - good; well ventilated and clean. State of kitchen - in as good condition as those of garrison. Food, quality of - good; same as used by garrison. Food, quantity of - all that is necessary. Water - all